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Gecko Leopard
Babies and adults in stock

Can special order any
Leopard young Leucistic yellow Price
Leopard Geckos Baby high Color, ALbino, Snow


Leopard Gecko Care Guide Introduction:

Leopard geckos are nocturnal lizards belonging to the Eublepharinae subfamily of the family Gekkonidae. They are robust geckos with relative large heads and a thick, fat-filled tail. The belly is white while the natural upper part is pale yellow to brown  with black leopard-like spots. Babies have broad black and white bands instead of spots. The skin is covered with numerous tiny wart-like tubercles, giving it a rough feeling. Their natural habitat includes the desert and dry savannah areas of Southern  Central Asia.

Leopard geckos make interesting pets. Right around the world thousands of these geckos are kept and bred and are available at various pet shops. When their basic husbandry requirements are met, these geckos are extremely hardy and a pleasure to keep.

Leopard Gecko Development


Hatchling / baby (day 1 to 4 months), juvenile (4 to 18 months), adult (18 months and older).
The average lifespan of a Leopard gecko is approximately 25 years.

Leopard Gecko Housing


Vivarium Size
A single Leopard gecko can be housed in an area as small as 30 x 30 cm / 12 x 12 ". One or two Leopards can be housed together in an ADDIS® (35 x 25 x 15) cm / (13.7 x 10 x 10) " container with the correct setup. A 10 gallon / 30 -50 l / (61 x 23 x  33) cm / (24 x 9 x 13) " tank or aquarium, a small reptile cabinet or cage "Pal pens™ "or "Desert dens™ " can also be used to house one to a few geckos. The floor space should increase with at least 25% for every gecko added after that.

Leopard Gecko Substrate:

Good bedding substrates include newspaper, butcher / brown paper, astroturf and carpet. Inappropriate substrates such as sand, egg shells, corn cob and any sized gravel or pebbles can give problems with ingestion and subsequent impaction. Pieces of driftwood,  bark or rocks can be used for terrarium decoration. It is essential to supply adequate hiding, such as a closed hide box, for geckos to stay and sleep during the day. Moist peat moss or moist vermiculite should be used as substrates in these sleeping  areas for the gecko to stay cool during the day and for normal shedding to take place.

Leopard Gecko Maintenance


Daily
Feeding, cleaning food containers, replacing water, poop scooping and removing old food residues.

Monthly
Vivarium cleaning and substrate replacement. Cleaning and sterilization of cage decorations and equipment.

Yearly
Inspection of all electrical equipment, plugs & switches should be done twice a year.

Leopard Gecko Environment


Leopard Gecko Temperature
Leopard geckos are ectothermic (relying on external heat sources to keep their body temperature at a suitable level) and poikilothermic (having a variable body temperature). Under tank heating such as a commercially available heat pads / heat strips or  heat lamps should be used as external heat source. This equipment should be placed in such as way to only emit about a third of the floor surface of the terrarium and should be separated by the (secured) substrate to prevent direct contact with the lizard.

Leopard geckos will then thermoregulate by moving towards or away from the heat. The temperature should be in the range of 25 - 32 ºC / 77 - 90 ºF during the day where the heated end is the warmest. The temperature can be allowed to naturally cool  down room temperature at night. Temperatures should be measured by using a thermometer directly on top of the substrate.

Leopard Gecko Lighting:

Leopard geckos are nocturnal (night living), meaning they hide away during most part of the day. When terrariums are used for displaying purposed, any non-heat transmitting light source like energy saving light bulbs or fluorescent tubes, that will not  affect the environmental temperature, should be adequate during the day. Some people go as far as installing a night light that would not affect the normal behavioral patterns of these geckos. These lights are quite expensive, but will enable you to observe  and appreciate these animals during the darker periods as well.

Leopard Gecko Day Length / Photoperiod
All lights should be on for about fourteen hours per day. Commercially available Leopard gecko electric timers can be used to automate the light cycle.

Leopard Gecko Feeding:


Crickets and mealworms should be the main foodstuff fed to Leopard geckos in captivity. Other foods include include Dubia roaches and other feeder cockroaches, Phoenix worms, waxworms, silkworms, Trevo worms and sometimes pinkies / nestling mice. Baby  Leopard geckos need small to medium sized insects to start off. Food should be gradually increased to adults. If the gecko is shy, leave the insects until the next morning. Grasshoppers should generally not be fed because of their hard exoskeleton. Fly  ants can be collected annually and be fed. Feeding should preferably take place within the terrarium where the animal is used to its immediate temperature.

Feeder insects should always be gut loaded with appropriate mineral / vitamin supplements and should be dusted two to three times a week with a calcium / vitamin D3 combination powder. Mealworms, waxworms and pinkies are good sources of fat. Because of  their fat tails, Leopard geckos can consume a lot of fat and store it for future emergency use. An ad lib supply of powdered calcium / vitamin D3 supplement as lick, should be supplied in a small shallow dish or lid for additional calcium needs.

Although Leopard geckos are desert reptiles, a shallow water container with clean fresh water should always be available.

Leopard Gecko Handling:


A Leopard gecko can be picked up by gently scooping your hand under its belly while supporting the body with the other. Let them rest in your palm with your fingers gently curled over the back.

Leopard Gecko Health:


Regular health inspections with a reptile friendly veterinarian are vital in the continual health of your pet. Try to bring a fresh faecal sample, sealed in an airtight ziplock bag, with your reptile to the consult room.

Leopard geckos are certainly one of the hardier gecko species in the pet trade today, but as with any captive kept lizard they are very dependent on the correct husbandry and diet to thrive. Because their basic terrarium setup is extremely simple, the  most common husbandry related problems are incorrect temperatures and calcium deficiency with or without subsequent substrate impaction. Too low temperatures will cause a decrease in appetite, stunted growth and may lead to morbidity and even mortality.  The most important dietary problem is inadequate feeder insect preparation and incorrect Leopard gecko supplementation. Incorrect calcium / vitamin D3 supplementation will almost always end up as metabolic bone disease (MBD) or “hypocalcaemia”.

Day Gecko
Out of stock


The genus Phelsuma consists of several lizards in the gecko family, commonly referred to as Day Geckos.
In contrast to most other gecko species, day geckos are active mainly during the day. Other diurnal geckos are members of the genus Lygodactylus and the genus Gonatodes. Day geckos have rounded pupils and a clear, fixed plate covering their eyes which they clean with their tongue. Day geckos do not have eyelids. Many species have bright green, red and blue colors which make them popular terrarium or vivarium pets. These brilliant colours play a role in intraspecies recognition and also serve as camouflage.

The length of the different Phelsuma species varies between about 6.5 to 30 centimetres (2.6 to 12 in), but the extinct Rodrigues Giant Day Gecko was even larger. Day geckos have toe pads consisting of tiny lamellae which allow them to walk on plain vertical and inverted surfaces like bamboo or glass. The inner toe on each foot is vestigial. Males have well-developed femoral pores on the undersurface of the rear limbs. These pores are less developed or absent in females. Females often have well-developed endolymphatic chalk sacs on the sides of their necks. These sacs store calcium, which is needed for egg production. Those eggs can often be seen through the ventral surface of the female's body shortly before they are laid. The hatchlings reach sexual maturity between 6-12 months. Smaller species may live up to ten years whereas the larger species have been reported to live more than 20 years in captivity.

Distribution and habitat


Day geckos inhabit the islands of the south-west part of the Indian Ocean. The exceptions are Phelsuma andamanense, which is endemic to the Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal, and Phelsuma dubia, which is also found on the East Coast of mainland Africa, although it is possible that it was introduced there. Most Phelsumas are found in Madagascar, which may also be the origin of the genus. Some species are found on neighbouring island groups, including the Mascarenes, Seychelles, Comoros. Due to human introduction, they are also often found on some of the Hawaiian Islands, including the Big Island and Kauai, and the state of Florida, where they were introduced as a form of pest control. The different Phelsuma species can be found from sea level up to 2,300 meters. Most day geckos are arboreal. They inhabit, amongst others, coconut palms and banana trees, but can also be found near human settlements, in gardens, on fences, houses and huts. An exception to this rule is Phelsuma barbouri, which is a terrestrial species

Diet


Day geckos feed on various kinds of insects and other invertebrates in the wild. They also eat nectar, pollen and occasionally soft, ripe and sweet fruits such as bananas.

In captivity, such a diet is simulated. Insects which may be used include: (wingless) fruit flies, various flies, wax moths, crickets, small super worms, small butter worms and mealworms. Fruit, which is required a few times a week, may be small pieces of papaya, banana, fruit based baby food, or commercial gecko nectars.

In 2008 a BBC film crew took footage of a Day gecko successfully begging a Planthopper insect for honeydew.[1]

Classification

The genus Phelsuma was first described by the British zoologist John Edward Gray in 1825 and named after the Dutch physician Murk van Phelsum. The genus consists of about 70 known species and subspecies.

Two Phelsuma species (Phelsuma gigas and Phelsuma edwardnewtoni) are now considered to be extinct, probably due to the destruction of their environment by human settlers and their domestic animals. Many day gecko species are endangered today because an increasing percentage of their natural habitat, especially tropical forest, is being destroyed by human activity

Tokay Gecko
Out of stock


The Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko) is a nocturnal arboreal gecko, ranging from northeast India and Bangladesh, throughout Southeast Asia, Philippines to Indonesia and western New Guinea. Its native habitat is rainforest trees and cliffs, and it also frequently adapts to rural human habitations, roaming walls and ceilings at night in search of insect prey. Increasing urbanization is reducing its range. In the late 1980s and early 1990s it was introduced into Hawaii, Florida, Texas, Belize, and several Caribbean islands, where it can be considered an invasive species.

The Tokay Gecko is known as a Tuko or Toko in the Philippines, Tokek in Indonesian/Javanese, and tắc kè in Vietnamese, for its characteristic vocalizations. People have mixed feelings about it ranging from terror of the belief that its feet can tear your skin off to admiration for its entertaining vocalizations in the Philippines, most people respect it and value it because it eats dangerous pests such as scorpions and giant centipedes
.

The Tokay Gecko is the second largest Gecko species, attaining lengths of about 30–40 cm (11–15 inches) for males, and 20–30 cm (7–11 inches) for females, with weights of only 150–300g (5–10 oz). They are distinctive in appearance, with a bluish or grayish body, sporting spots ranging from light yellow to bright red. The male is more brightly colored than the female. They have large eyes with a vertical slit pupil. Eyes are brown to greenish brown and can be orange or yellow.

When the Tokay bites, they often won't let go for a few minutes or even up to an hour or more, and it is very difficult to remove without causing harm to the gecko. For this reason, it is considered to be best as an ornamental animal for experienced reptile owners.
[edit] Recent Fad

The Tokay Gecko or Toko is quickly becoming a threatened species in The Philippines because of indiscriminate hunting. Collecting, transporting and trading geckos without a license can be punishable by up to twelve years in jail and a fine of up to 1,000,000 pesos under Republic Act 9147 in addition to other applicable international laws. However, the trade runs unchecked due to the sheer number of illegal traders and reports of lucrative deals. Chinese buyers and other foreign nationals are rumored to pay thousands of dollars for large specimens, reportedly because of their alleged medicinal value or as commodities in the illegal wildlife trade.[2] The Philippine government has issued a warning against using geckos to treat AIDS and impotence, saying the folkloric practice in parts of Asia may put patients at risk
Males are very territorial, and will attack other male Tokays as well as other Gecko species, as well as anything else in their territory. They are solitary and only meet during the mating season. Females lay clutches of one or two hard shelled eggs which are guarded until they hatch. Tokay Geckos feed on insects and small vertebrates.[1]

The typical lifespan is 7–10 years, however in captivity some Tokays have been known to live over 18 years

Crested Geckos
In stock


The Crested Gecko has hair-like projections found above the eyes, resembling eyelashes. It has a wedge shaped head and a crest that runs from each eye to the tail. The toes and the tip of the semi-prehensile tail are covered in small hairs called setae. Each seta is divided into hundreds of smaller (approximately 200 nanometres in diameter) hairs called spatulae. It is believed these structures exploit the weak van der Waals force to help the gecko climb on most solid surfaces. The toes have small claws which aid in climbing surfaces to which their toes cannot cling. Once they lose their tail it will not grow back.[citation needed]

The Crested Gecko has many naturally occurring color groups, some of which include: grey, brown, red, orange, and yellow of various shades. They have variable markings, which include spots, straight stripes, and tiger-like stripes. The markings and coloration are not geographic indicators; offspring of the same clutch may display differing coloration and markings. The colors are brighter and more prominent at night.

The Crested Gecko has distinct structural morphs in head size and crest abundancy. Geckos with a head length less than 1.3 times its width are considered "crowned" Crested Geckos. They can vary in the amount and size of the crests; some have crests that extend to the base of the tail and some lack crests on one side of their body.

Geographic distribution

The Crested Gecko is endemic to South Province, New Caledonia. There are three disjunct populations, one found on the Isle of Pines and surrounding islets, and there are two populations found on the main island of Grande Terre. One population is around the Blue River, which is a protected provincial park, and the other is further north, just south of Mount Dzumac.

Ecology and behavior


The Crested Gecko has no eyelids; a transparent scale, or spectacle, keeps its eyes moist and it uses its tongue to clear away debris. Like all Rhacodactylus geckos, it has webbing on its legs and digits. They are a mostly arboreal species, preferring to inhabit the canopy of the New Caledonian rainforests, and because of this they can jump considerably well. They are primarily nocturnal, and will generally spend the daylight hours sleeping in a secure spot in a tree. The Crested Gecko, unlike the closely related Gargoyle Gecko (Rhacodactylus auriculatus), will not regrow its tail once lost.[1] The cells around the base of the tail are brittle, allowing the tail to break away when threatened or caught by a predator. The capillaries to the tail will close almost instantly so there is little to no blood loss. The tails will move independently of the body for 2–5 minutes. The loss of their tail is not problematic, and most adults in the wild do not have their tails.

Unlike most species of gecko, this species is an omnivore, also considered frugiverous, feeding a variety of insects and fruit.

Captivity


Though the export of wild Crested Geckos is now prohibited, biologists exported several specimens for breeding and study before the practice was outlawed.[1] From these specimens, different breeding lines were established both in Europe and the United States.[1] The Crested Gecko is now one of the most widely kept and bred species of gecko in the world.

These geckos can be very long lived. While they have not been kept in captivity long enough for a definitive life span determination, they are thought to live for 7-10 years or more. They are usually fed crickets and a crested gecko supplement such as Repashy's Crested Gecko Diet or fruit flavored baby food (which is known to be harmful due to lack of nutrients).

Reproduction


Little is known about the wild reproductive behavior of Crested Geckos, but in captivity they breed readily, with the female laying two eggs which hatch 60–90 days after they are laid. Eggs are generally laid at four week intervals as long as the fat and calcium reserves of the female are still at healthy levels. Crested Geckos have a small sac for calcium in their mouth. If an egg laying female does not have enough calcium her sac will be depleted, and she can suffer from calcium deficiency. This can lead to lethargy, lack of appetite, and even death. Eggs laid by a female whose calcium reserves are low occasionally exhibit signs of metabolic bone disease, such as an under bite, or a sharp dip at the base of the tail.

It is undetermined whether heat plays a role in determining the sex of the embryo, as it can with other gecko species. Newly hatched Crested Geckos will generally not eat until after they shed their skin for the first time, relying on the remains of their yolk sack for nutrition.

A female crested only has to mate with a male once in order to lay 2 eggs per month for upwards of 8-10 months. Retaining of sperm ensures the eggs the female lays remain fertile throughout her breeding cycle. After those 8-10 months, females in the wild go through a "cooling" cycle, usually prompted by slight temperature changes in winter, which help her regain lost nutrients from egg-laying. In captivity this cooling cycle must be controlled or the female will lay eggs continuously, even to death.

Status in the wild


Long believed extinct, the species was rediscovered in 1994 after a tropical storm.[1] It is currently being assessed for CITES protection and endangered status. The biggest single threat to the wild population appears to be the introduction of the little fire ant (Wassmania auropunctata) to New Caledonia.[1] The ants prey on the geckos, stinging and attacking in great numbers and also compete with the geckos for food by preying on arthropods.

Desert horned lizard
In stock



Description:
This species of lizard has a distinctive flat body with one row of fringe scales down the sides. They have one row of slightly enlarged scales on each side of the throat. Colours can vary and generally blend in with the color of the surrounding soil, but they usually have a beige, tan, or reddish dorsum with contrasting, wavy blotches of darker color. They have two dark blotches on the neck that are very prominent and are bordered posteriorly by a light white or grey color. They also have pointed scales on the dorsum (back) of the body. Juveniles are similar to adults, but have shorter and less-pronounced cranial spines. Desert horned lizards have horns that are wide at the base, which isn't true for their congener, the short-horned lizard.

Diet:
Desert horned lizards prey primarily on invertebrates, such as harvester ants, crickets, grasshoppers, beetles, worms, flies, and some plant material. They can often be found in the vicinity of ant hills, where they sit and wait for ants to pass by. When they find an area of soft sand, they usually shake themselves vigorously, throwing sand over their backs and leaving only their head exposed. This allows them to hide from predators and await their unsuspecting prey.

Habitat:
Found in extremely diverse habitats. The flat-tailed horned lizard occurs in areas of fine sand, while the short-horned lizard (P. douglassii) is found in shortgrass prairie all the way up into spruce-fir forest. The most common species in the Arizona Upland subdivision is the regal horned lizard (P. solare), which frequents rocky or gravelly habitats of arid to semiarid plains, hills and lower mountain slopes.
In captivity they should be kept in a cage no smaller than a 20 gallon tank, needing length more than height. The tank should be layered with 2-4in of sand so that the lizard may burrow.

Lighting:
Basking temperatures should be around 110 degrees and around 85 ambient. With night time temperatures staying above 60 degrees.
A uvb source must also be present at a desert 10.0 series.
A light cycle of 12 hours a day is also recommended.

Geographic range & subspecies:
They typically range from southern Idaho in the north to northern Mexico in the south.

There are considered to be two subspecies: the northern desert horned lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos platyrhinos) ranging in Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, the Colorado front range, and parts of southeastern Oregon; and the southern desert horned lizard (Phrynosoma platyrhinos calidiarum) ranging in southern Utah and Nevada to southeast California, western Arizona, and northern Baja California.

Behavior:
They are generally a gentle species, but have been known to try to push their cranial spines into the hand while held. When excited, they puff themselves up with air, similar to the way a Chuckwalla does, making themselves look bigger. If spotted near a bush, they will dash into it in an attempt to find cover from any threat. If threatened, they may (seldom) hiss and threaten to bite, and have been known to squirt blood from their eyes as far as 5 feet.


Rankins Dragon
In Stock


Description

The Rankins Dragon is very similar in looks and in care as the bearded dragon, but there are differences; the main being that they only reach a maximum size of 10-12". They are a very sociable species and can be kept in groups. Arm waving has been seen by hatchlings just a few hours old. Other behavioral actions are tails curling upwards in alert animals and mouth gaping in basking animals to release excess heat. On occasion they will also inflate their eyes out of their sockets but this is of no concern and is thought to be to loosen the skin around there eyes before they shed. They will also inflate their whole body and puff out their beard for the same reason. Rankins dragons love to bathe so a water bowl should be available at all times with water an inch or so deep, and large enough for them to move around in. This will need to be changed regularly as they will defecate in this too.

Housing

An enclosure measuring 36"x18"x18" will be ideal for a pair of adult Rankins with the spot light at one end. If more are to be kept together then a longer enclosure will be necessary and maybe a second spot light. Decor can include some branches for them to climb, some cork tubes for a hide, and a rock or flat stone under the spot lights. Substrate is a much talked about subject as they all seem to have there pros and cons. Whichever substrate you decide to use make the depth of it a couple of inches deep, as at night they like to semi-submerge themselves in it.

Lighting/Heating

Rankins prefer a slightly lower basking temperature than Beardeds. My Rankins are given a hot spot of around the low 90s°F; the middle of the vivarium between 80-85°F, and the cool end around 75°F. To help maintain these temperatures a dimmer thermostat on a low wattage lamp can be used. A low wattage lamp is to allow them to bask for longer periods. If a high wattage lamp was to be used it would soon reach the temperatures set and turn off depriving them of a basking site. The wattage will depend on the vivarium size and ambient room temperature the vivarium is in. Other heat sources may be needed to create these temperatures in the vivarium. Again this will depend on vivarium size and where it is situated, this is why the vivarium should be set up and running before the lizard is purchased so it can be tweaked until all the temperatures are satisfactory. A high/low thermometer will be handy here to register temperatures during the night as well as the day.

Being a diurnal lizard they will also require a source of UVB light. 8.0 or 10.0% UVB fluorescent tubes running the full length of the vivarium.  The UVB light output from these tubes starts to decrease from the moment they are first used and so need to be changed regularly (see manufacturers recommendation on box). full spectrum lights are left on the same amount of time as the spot lights are - about 12-14 hours in the summer and reduced to 10-12 hours in the winter.

Diet

Being omnivorous, Rankins will eat vegetation as well as insects and so should be given both. They will benefit greatly with a much varied diet Crickets, mealworms. Vegetables and greens should also be offered

Bearded Dragon
Variety of morphs in stock

Normal, Leatherback, And silkback morphs in stock

Introduction:
The Common Bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), otherwise known as the Central, Inland or Yellow-headed Bearded dragon originates from arid, semi-desert parts of Australia. They are calm and curious dragons, each with their own personality, which makes them great pets.

Bearded Dragon Development

Hatchling (day 1 to 6 weeks), juvenile (6 weeks to 9 months), adult (9 months and older).

The lifespan of a Bearded dragon is approximately 7 to 12 years.

Bearded Dragon Housing:


Vivarium Size
Adult Bearded dragons can grow up to about 60 cm / 24 " in length (sometimes larger). For this a terrarium with a floor space of at least (90 x 35) cm / (35 x 14) " is needed for a single Bearded dragon, and (130 x 42) cm / (50 x 17) " for an adult pair. A 40 gal / 150 l / (91 x 46 x 43) cm / (36 x 18 x 17) " tank / aquarium, should be large enough for a single adult Bearded dragon and a 55 gal / 200 l / (122 x 33 x 53) cm / (48 x 13 x 21) " tank should be adequate for an adult pair. The floor space should increase by at least 25% for every Bearded dragon added after that. Other commonly used Bearded dragon housing enclosures include large cabinets and large plastic cages.

Bearded Dragon Substrate:

Good bedding substrates include newspaper, butcher / brown paper carpet and astroturf. Inappropriate substrates such as sand, soil, egg shells, corn cob or any sized gravel or pebbles can give problems with ingestion and subsequent impaction.

Do not house different sized / aged dragons together until they are at least six months old. Larger Bearded dragons tend to “bully” the smaller ones and can even cause fatal biting injuries.

Bearded Dragon Maintenance:


Daily
Feeding, cleaning food containers, replacing water, poop scooping and removing old food residues.

Monthly
Terrarium cleaning and substrate replacement. Replacement of heat and UV source (UV lights should be replaced every five to six months). Cleaning and sterilization of cage decorations and equipment. Diluted F10 can be used for effective and safe cleaning or terrariums or cage furniture.

Yearly
Inspection of all electrical equipment, plugs & switches should be done twice a year.

Bearded Dragon Environment:


Bearded Dragon Temperature
Beardies are ectothermic (relying on external heat sources to keep their body temperature at a suitable level) and poikilothermic (having a variable body temperature). A basking spot should be supplied (use a 60 Watt spotlight about 20 cm / 8 " above a flat piece of rock). This will also provide most of the environmental heat. For a dragon to thermoregulate, temperatures should range from about 24 ºC / 75 ºF on one side to about 34 ºC / 93 ºF on the other, the hot spot of course being hotter (about 40 ºC / 104 ºF).

To provide shade and a cooler surface to climb on, driftwood or a piece of stomp should be placed on the cooler side of the terrarium. Although not necessary, night temperatures can drop to as low as 17 ºC / 62 ºF.

Bearded Dragon Lighting:

For UVA and UVB requirements a full spectrum reptile lamp (preferably 5% or more) should be mounted about 30 cm / 12 " above the basking area. UVA helps make food appear more appealing thus stimulating feeding behavior. Bearded dragon UVB is needed for calcium absorption and bone mineralization. For sufficient UV requirements, even if artificial UV is supplied, these reptiles should be placed in natural sunlight for at least one to two hours a day.

Day Length / Photoperiod
All lights (including heat lights) should be on for about 14 hours per day. Commercially available Bearded dragon electric timers can be used to automate the light cycle.

Bearded Dragon Feeding:


Beardies are omnivorous, which means they eat meat (mostly insects) and plant material. Young dragons are more dependant on proteins, thus their diet should consist of insects with about 20% fruits, greens and vegetables. From about ten months a gradual change to mostly plant material can be made. A good rule of thumb is that food (insects & plant material) should be about the same length as the space between the animal’s eyes, but for larger dragons it can be up to 2/3rds of its head.

Crickets are commercially the most available insects and it is jam packed with most of the Beardies’ nutritional needs. Insects can be fed dead or alive. It should always be gut loaded and dusted two to three times a week with a suitable calcium supplement. It is recommended that the crickets of growing babies and juveniles and gravid females are dusted three times a week, otherwise two times should be adequate. To gut load insects additional fruits and vegetables (mentioned below for Bearded dragons) and a good quality cat food can be fed 24 to 48 before feeding.

Other commercial foods include Dubia roaches and other feeder cockroaches, silkworms and Phoenix worms. Less desirable Bearded dragon food items include mealworms, waxworms, superworms, Trevo worms, grasshoppers and nestling mice.

Suitable fruits include kiwis, grapes, strawberries, bananas and papayas while greens include lucerne, nasturtium, carrot tops, parsley, celery, rosemary, oregano and basil. Vegetables such as carrots, corn, green beans, peas and beetroot are also favorites. Onions, spinach and cabbage type vegetables should be avoided.

Bearded dragon feeding should preferably take place within the vivarium where the animal is used to its immediate temperature. Young dragons should preferably be fed three to four times a day (not less than two times a day) while older Bearded dragons can be fed daily or every other day. Feeding should take place not more than two hours before lights out and not less than two hours after lights on. Feed as much as the animal can eat within 15 minutes.

Bearded Dragon Handling:


Gently scoop up the dragon with your hand under its belly and always take care to support the body. Let them rest in your palm with your fingers gently curled over the back. It is important to always wash your hands with a suitable disinfectant soap after Bearded dragon handling, its food or its cage furniture.

Bearded Dragon Health:

Regular health inspections with a reptile friendly veterinarian are vital in the continual health of your pet. Try to take a fresh faecal sample, sealed in an airtight ziplock bag, with your reptile to the consult room.

Some of the most common Bearded dragon health problems include gut parasites, environmental stress, metabolic bone disease (MBD), sand impactions, physical injuries due to falling, burns from incorrect placed heat sources and stress. Most of these can be avoided with the correct husbandry. MBD can be prevented by the combination of enough calcium and the correct UV lighting. Less common problems include parasites such as ticks, lice and adenovirus.

Consult your reptile friendly veterinarian or herpetologist if any of the abovementioned problems occur.

Green Iguana
Out of stock


INTRODUCTION:

An arboreal lizard, mainly from the South & Central American rain forests, sometimes seen in captivity in the reptile houses of zoo's and wildlife parks, the Iguana is a large colourful lizard, mostly mottled shades of green in colour with varying black banding on the body and tail. Most Iguanas can learn to become tame with regular handling and petting. Males when adult can be territorial, and usually do better kept separate from other males. Iguanas have been known to show some aggression and for this reason they are not recommended as an ideal reptile purchase for beginners or children.

CAPTIVE ENVIRONMENT:


Use full spectrum 5% "UVB" lighting around 12 hours per day, which mimics natural sunlight, this is a special reptile tube light, (Reptisun, Zoomed, T-Rex etc) and not the cheaper horticultural Gro-Lux type which are of no use for UVB output. (for maximum effect change every 6 months).
Provide a spot-lit basking area with access to a cooler area, (Gradient).
Supply branches and logs for climbing and exploring, making sure there is nothing the Iguana could trap or snag its claws on.
Heating pads can help maintain the required temperature from below, and are a useful supplement especially during cold weather.
Note: experiments are continuing throughout 2005/06 into UVB and which is the best tube/lamp to use, until these investigations are written then the normal 5% UVB tube is recommended

HANDLING:


Both sexes can benefit from frequent handling to help with taming, they will sometimes initially struggle to get free, but are also known to actually enjoy being stroked or rubbed on the body and will sometimes sit still for a while and accept this petting, care should be taken during breeding season when behaviour (in particular of males) can be erratic, and so common sense would be to avoid the facial area, avoid leaving Iguanas with unsupervised children and generally keep your eyes on them at all times especially around fingers arms legs or feet.

NATURAL HABITATION:


Green Iguanas are arboreal lizards (tree dwelling) they inhabit the Tropical rain forests of South and Central America at reasonably low altitudes of up to 1,000 metres, (High altitudes being too cold).
In captivity adult Iguana's require a habitat, compound, den, vivarium, call it what you will, of at least 6' x 5' x 4'.
more space is always better whenever possible.

TEMPERATURE:


Daytime temperatures should be:
Basking area around 85-95 degrees F.
Cool area 75-85 degrees F.
Night temperatures can fall to around 70 degrees, even perhaps lower, as long as they are able to warm up in the morning.
Extra care should be taken during times of power cuts / failure, try to give this some thought so you are prepared if need be.
Basking area temp may be a little higher, as long as the Iguana is able to move to a cooler spot to thermoregulate.

HUMIDITY:


Iguana's require moderate to high levels of humidity.
You can help achieve this by misting the vivarium every other day, spray misting the Iguana himself and frequent bathing.
A large dish of water in his habitat will also help with this process through evaporation.
Humidity also helps considerably with the shedding process of Iguanas.

WATER REQUIREMENTS:


Supply a large fairly deep water dish for drinking, with fresh water provided daily.
Note: If the Iguana also uses this for bathing, then be aware that they have a strong tendency to defecate in water, it seems to have a laxative effect on them, therefore it will need replacing on a more regular basis. .

ANATOMY:


Two very important anatomical features.
First, Thermoregulation.
An Iguana (as with all cold blooded species) cannot generate its own body heat, and so must thermoregulate, by moving in and out of hot and cooler spots (gradients) to maintain the correct body temperature.
Hence the different temperature zones indicated in TEMPERATURE above.
Secondly, Metabolism.
Iguanas need UVB light (in the absence of natural sunlight) to convert Vitamin D into its active form, in this active form it can then assist in the absorption of calcium into the body.
So sunlight or in the absence of it, at least 12 hours of full spectrum light (UVB) is required daily to ensure your Iguana remains healthy.
This together with a good calcium intake and the required warmth will prevent the occurrence of MBD (Metabolic Bone Disease).
A good varied diet should ensure the required calcium levels are taken up, but if in any doubt then a commercial calcium / vitamin supplement (sprinkled on food) may be given occasionally as a top up, or at times such as, when females are gravid, if you have a picky eater, or if the Iguana has a loss of appetite due to breeding condition, change of surroundings etc.
Further more detailed anatomy information is available on the Ignatomy page.

BEHAVIOUR:


Most Iguanas can become tame to some degree, with regular handling and petting.
Males can be territorial, and usually do better kept separate from other males.
Behaviour is sometimes erratic during breeding season when extra care should be taken in handling, due to some having the tendency to become more aggressive at this time.
Iguanas are normally lethargic creatures, and can become even more so by a number of happenings, such as, a change of habitat or owner, being handled by a different person, breeding season, a change in diet, or indeed anything out of the norm.
They are creatures of habit and tend to sulk if this is disturbed in anyway, but usually the appetite and normality returns after a short break.

ILLNESS:

This section is intended to help with initial identification of these problems, if problems persist or if they appear serious then veterinarian advice should be sought. The only person able to diagnose disease and prescribe medication is a veterinarian. (see vet's page for help in locating one)

Sadly the one most commonly associated with Iguanas MBD (Metabolic Bone Disease) need not exist, if owners took all the necessary steps in the care, diet, and housing of their iguanas.
Calcium, warmth and UVB lighting prevent MBD from occurring, but sometimes when an Iguana has been rescued or received from an unwanted situation, where care has not been a priority, then the signs of this disease can be apparent.
The good news is it can mostly be reversible depending on severity, especially in early cases, with the Iguana going on to lead a near normal life.
Signs are....swollen limbs, receding jaws that look out of line from the side, dragging of legs, spongy areas around the mouth and in severe cases, deformed bones and a twisted lumpy spine.
Consider prevention of this disease your duty (makes it easy to remember)...
D.U.T.Y.
Diet, UVB, Temperature, You to ensure they receive it, Therefore resulting in no problems with MBD.

Mites...Little creatures usually no bigger than a full stop "....."
they can hide under your Iguanas scales, in the neck creases, dewlap folds and around the eyes and feed on their blood.
Mites can be hard to get rid of due to the number of hiding places available in the habitat.
There are many mite eradication preparations now available, but they must be used in combination with cleanliness to be effective.
Get a veterinarians diagnosis if you suspect mites but are unsure.
Mite information page.

Worms...Intestinal parasites, Can sometimes be seen like a tiny light coloured thread "~~~~" moving in the faeces.
A faecal examination from a vet can confirm the infection.
Fairly easy to treat, a first dose to kill off the parasites present, with a follow up dose around 2 weeks later to catch any hatched eggs should do the trick, again while being treated cleanliness is a must to prevent re-infection.
Veterinarians diagnosis should be required to confirm.

Tail (loss of)...Although not an illness as such, it does happen and can be a worrying sight for an Iguana's owner, so for a brief explanation.
The Iguanas tail is designed to come away easily, but unfortunately cannot be re-attached.
It is generally thought to be an escape mechanism in the wild, where a predator can be left with the tail while the Iguana makes its escape.
Because of this, never try to catch or hold your Iguana by its tail.
Loss of tail is mostly something that happens to juvenile Iguanas and is normally re-grown, but to a lesser size and colour than before, it usually heals ok but monitor for signs of infection and keep clean while healing.
Stomatitis (Mouthrot)...An illness which can if left untreated eventually be fatal! It usually presents by bleeding gums, a greeny/grey cheesy substance noticeable when yawning or eating, and a lack of appetite. Treatment consists of Antibiotics (sometimes 2 types combined) and removal of the caseous plaque from the injured mouth, needless to say a Veterinarian is needed to oversee this treatment. Causes can be an injury to the mouth allowing the bacteria to enter the wound, soft gums due to lack of UVB or a generally run down unhealthy Iguana.

LIFE EXPECTANCY:


The normal life expectancy of a healthy Iguana is around 15 years, some have indeed lived longer than this (oldest recorded being 29 years Hatfield), and many have died younger, many Iguanas fed on a previously bad diet of dog or cat food for example, seem to die around 6 years of age due to kidney / liver problems.

SEXING:


Exact sexing especially in juveniles is very difficult and can only be done in certainty by someone with veterinarian experience in a procedure called probing the cloacal vent. However the characteristics that develop as they get older, can give a good idea of gender, and these are, In males...usually larger - heads, dewlaps and subtympanic scales, the femoral pores which are a row of glands along the underside of the thighs are much larger and more pronounced in males, and also exude a waxy substance that is used to distribute scent, also erratic behaviour during breeding season which may consist of biting , nipping and sometimes aggression but note this behaviour is not shown in all males and can indeed be shown in a few females.
Headbobbing, a series of movements of the head both up and down and less often side to side, are usually much more pronounced in males.

For females, generally the opposite of the above ...smaller dewlaps, heads and subtympanic scales, the rows of femoral pores are just small dots, and in breeding season they sometimes start digging or scratching as if looking for somewhere to lay eggs.
They may become gravid and actually lay eggs but these would obviously be sterile if no male has been in attendance.
Sexing Page.

NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS:


Iguanas are herbivores and so require a good varied vegetarian diet, some outdated information crops up now and again mainly in old books, that says they can eat crickets, mice or cat & dog food, thankfully this information now tends to be disappearing fast, all experts are now in agreement on the herbivore status.
The diet below gives a good example of foods that can be offered and doesn't need to be adhered to 100% but is supplied for guidance purposes, I find in winter time when fresh food can be scarce, a good substitute is the pre-packed mixed bags of salad greens available in all supermarkets, try to avoid the ones containing lettuce which is practically water and nil nutrition, these can be further supplemented with dandelion leaves.

DIET: Feed up to 50% of,
Leafy greens, Collards, Mustard greens, Turnip greens, Nasturtiums (leaves & flowers), Dandelions (leaves & flowers), Escarole, Rocket, Hibiscus leaves and flowers, Watercress, Land cress, fresh Alfalfa and Carrot tops.

Up to 35% of,
Green beans, Zucchini, Squash, Bean sprouts, Okra, Parsley, Grated carrot Red Yellow or Green bell peppers (Sweet peppers), Leeks, Peas, Cucurbits, Parsnips alfalfa pellets, Vine leaves, Chinese greens and Celery.

Around 10% of,
Fruits such as Papayas, Blackberries, Kiwi, Peach, Banana, Grapes, Plums, Apricots, Oranges, Clementines, Satsuma's, Mango's, Apples, Figs, Strawberries, Pear, Cherry, Melons, Fuchsia fruits and Rose hips.

Up to 5% from the occasional foods below,

The following contain "Oxalates" which binds with calcium and hampers absorption, and should not be fed in large quantities, Chard, Spinach, Rhubarb stems only (beware rhubarb leaves are very toxic), Dock, Sorrel, Beets and Beet greens.

These contain "Goitrogens", so same as above feed in small quantities only, Cabbage, Broccoli, Kale, Cauliflower, Brussel sprouts and Bok choy.

Finally, Bread, Pasta, and Rice are grain foods and may be offered once or twice a week as treats.


Water Dragons
Out of stock


Chinese Water Dragons (Physignathus cocincinus) are also known as Asian Water Dragons, Thai Water Dragons, and Green Water Dragons. A related species, P. lesuerurii, is often called the Eastern or Australian Water Dragon.


Details

Chinese water dragons can grow up to 90 cm (3 ft) in length for males and up to 60 cm (2 ft) for females but 2/3 of this is tail length. Colouration ranges from dark to light green. Diagonal stripes of green or turquoise are found on the body, while the tail is banded from the middle to the end with green and dark brown. Their undersides range from white, off white, very pale green, or pale yellow. But more attractive are their throats, which can be quite colourful (generally yellow, orange, or peach), some with a single color, some with stripes. Adult males have larger, more triangular heads than females, and develop larger crests on the head, neck and tail, and are larger in general. The tail, slightly over two-thirds of the entire body length, can be used as a weapon, for balance, and to assist swimming. Like many other reptiles the Chinese water dragon possesses a small, iridescent, photosensitive spot between their eyes referred to as the pineal gland (or colloquially as the third eye) that is thought to help thermoregulate their bodies by sensing differences in light to assist with basking and seeking shelter after sunset.[1] Since it recognizes differences in light, the pineal gland can also help the lizard avoid predation from birds and other aerial threats.


Habitat and behaviours

Native to the lowland and highland forests of India, Northern and southern [[CBich, Burma), Chinese water dragons are most commonly found along the banks of freshwater lakes and streams. They are active during the day (diurnal), and spend most of their time in the trees or plants (arboreal). If threatened, the dragon will drop from the trees into the water and either swim to safety or remain submerged for up to 25 minutes. Water dragons live in areas with average humidity levels of 40–80% and temperatures ranging from 80–90 °F (26–32 °C).

Diet

Though they will also eat vegetation, the diet of the water dragon consists mainly of insects, supplemented with an occasional small fish, mammal or reptile.

For the captive lizard, crickets, locusts, cockroaches and mealworms are good staple foods, and they may eat as many as 3–5 during feeding, depending on the size. Insects should be gut loaded prior to feeding with foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes, apples, or bran oats. This increases the nutritional value of the insects. Insects can also be dusted with calcium and nutrient-rich powders, which can be found in reptile pet-stores. Powders such as this should be used in moderation and as specified. Meal worms and wax worms are favorites, though wax worms should be fed in moderation, as their nutritional value is low. Worms from the garden are also considered a nice treat, however, if any pesticide has been used in the area, it may be a good idea to avoid them.



Savannah Monitors:
Out of stock


Savannah monitors are larger pet lizards that are known to be some of the more docile lizards of the monitor group. They aren’t really active lizards but usually tolerate handling quite well.

Native to Africa, savannah monitors need a dry, hot environment for them to thrive in. They spend most of their time in the wild basking in the sun and eating a variety of small prey food such as rodents, smaller lizards, and insects. They are carnivores and prone to obesity, therefore it is vital to monitor the weight of your savannah monitor to prevent excess weight gain. Feeding juveniles a few times a week is fine but adult savannahs may only need to eat once a week.

Savannah monitors will grow to be about 3 to 4 feet long. Regular handling will make them more tame but like all monitors, if they are not a captive bred baby or are not handled often savannah monitors can become aggressive.

Housing:


Savannahs are strong, large, escape artists. A large, secure enclosure is necessary to house any savannah monitor. A full grown savannah needs a minimum of an 8 feet by 4 feet enclosure, or twice the length of the monitor. A juvenile (young) savannah will be alright in a 55 gallon aquarium for short period of time but since they grow quickly most owners have their adult set-up ready when they bring home a baby.

The height of the enclosure should prevent them from escaping and allow a branch or other decoration in the cage in the off chance that they want to climb on something. Monitors can be destructive so other than some rocks and hides decorations aren't necessary. A large water dish that will allow the entire monitor to submerge himself should be in the cage as well. A large cat litter box is a popular alternative to reptile dishes sold at the pet store. They usually defecate in their water dishes so make sure it stays clean.

Screen sided enclosures will be shredded so glass or plexiglass housing is best. Make sure the cage has a secure lock and a place for heat lights and UVB lighting on top.

Heat and Lighting:


A basking temperature of 95-100 degrees Fahrenheit should be provided along with a temperature gradient down to 85 in the day and as low as 75 at night. Ceramic heat emitters are best for achieving night time temperatures instead of lights.

UVB lighting is necessary for almost all lizards. A high percentage UVB output bulb (8-10%) should be on for a 10-12 hour cycle daily to mimic the sun. These bulbs should be changed every 6 months, even if the light doesn't burn out, since the invisible UVB rays expire. Diseases such as metabolic bone disease will occur without appropriate UVB rays.

Feeding Savannah Monitors:


As with any exotic pet, the more natural a diet, the better. Savannahs will eat gut loaded insects such as crickets, roaches, and earthworms along with appropriately sized rodents. Pinky mice, fuzzies, adult mice, and various sized rats are the usual fare in captivity. Calcium powder should be dusted onto insects and young rodents that don't have good bone density. A low fat, high quality (grain-free) canned dog or monitor food can be fed only occasionally as too much protein can lead to disease like gout.

Bedding:


Savannah monitors can be voracious eaters. Therefore if they have bedding that is bite sized they may get a mouth full when trying to grab their food. If your savannah will be enjoying his dinner on his bedding, choose a bedding that won't cause an impaction.

Paper towels, butcher paper, towels, repti-carpet, felt and other easily cleaned and changed, flat bedding options are best for messy savannah's. If you prefer a more natural look go for small substrate like calcium sand that is semi-digestible in very small amounts, or just don't feed your savannah on his bedding.

Uromastyx
Red nigerian, in stock


The Uromastyx is a genus of lizard whose members are better-known as Spiny-tailed lizards, uromastyxes, mastigures, or dabb lizards. Uromastyx are primarily herbivorous, but occasionally eat insects, especially when young. They spend most of their waking hours basking in the sun, hiding in underground chambers at daytime or when danger appears. They tend to establish themselves in hilly, rocky areas with good shelter and accessible vegetation.

Description


Their size ranges from 25 cm (10 in) (U. macfadyeni) to 91 cm (36 in) or more (U. aegyptia). Hatchlings or neonates are usually no more than 7–10 cm (3–4 in) in length. Like many reptiles, these lizards' colors change according to the temperature; during cool weather they appear dull and dark but the colors become lighter in warm weather, especially when basking; the darker pigmentation allows their skin to absorb sunlight more effectively.

Their spiked tail is muscular and heavy, and can be swung at an attacker with great velocity, usually accompanied by hissing and an open-mouthed display of (small) teeth.[3] Uromastyxs generally sleep in their burrows with their tails closest to the opening, in order to thwart intruders

Nutrition


These lizards acquire most of the water they need from the vegetation they ingest. Giving a Uromastyx a water bowl can lead to higher humidity in the cage and can cause problems for the animal. Captive uromastyxs’ diets must be vegetarian herbivorous, consisting primarily of endive, dandelion greens, bok choy, and escarole. Some lettuces have almost no nutritive value, but can be given once in a while as a water source. They can consume de-thorned cacti with their powerful jaws, especially if they need water. The lizards' food can be dusted with a calcium and a uromastyx designed supplement to help prevent health problems. However, a special UVB bulb must be used in order for them to absorb the calcium from the gut. It is very important to avoid spinach, chard and flowering kale in the diets of all reptiles, since the oxalates in spinach prevent the uptake of calcium into the bloodstream. Insects should not be fed to an Uromastyx. The high levels of protein can cause liver damage. These animals are herbivores, as stated above, that means they should only be fed plant matter.

Captivity


The Mali Uromastyx (Uromastyx maliensis) is considered an ideal species to choose as a pet because they readily adapt to a captive environment. Another species of Uromastyx that adapts to captivity well, and comes in a wide variety of colors, is Uromastyx ocellata ornata. Artificial UVB/UVA light and vitamin supplements must be balanced with proper food and nutrition, UVB light is required for calcium absorption from the gut. Most commercially available UVB lights lose efficiency after 6 months and need to be replaced. Proper enclosures can be costly, as these are roaming animals with large space needs for their size, combined with the need to provide heat and ultraviolet light. Though the lizards bask at very high temperatures, there must be a temperature gradient within the enclosure allowing them to cool off away from the heat lamps. A cooling-down period over winter months can trigger the breeding response when temperatures rise in the spring. The temporary slowing-down of their metabolisms also lengthens the animals' lifespans.

Uromastyx are burrowing lizards, and need substrate deep enough to burrow in, or a low structure under which to hide. In the wild, these lizards' burrows can reach 305 cm (10 ft) in length.

Tegu
Gold, in stock


Tupinambis is a lizard genus which belongs to the family Teiidae, and contains seven described species. These large, South American lizards are commonly referred to as tegus; Tupinambis merianae (Argentine Black and White Tegu), Tupinambis rufescens (Red Tegu), and Tupinambis teguixin (Colombian Black and White Tegu, Gold Tegu, or Common Tegu) are all common in the pet trade. Tegus that have escaped or have been illegally released have adapted to life in the wild in some of the more remote areas of South Florida.

Tegus are usually primarily carnivorous, except for T. rufescens (which is primarily herbivorous) and T. merianae (which changes from a mostly carnivorous diet as a juvenile, to a mostly herbivorous diet as an adult[1]). Tegus fill the same ecological niche as monitor lizards and are an example of convergent evolution.

In captivity

The two most docile and easiest to handle species are the Argentine Black and White Tegu and the Red Tegu. Additionally, a new variety has been recently introduced, called the Blue tegu due to the tendency of males to become bright blue upon maturity. These variations grow from just under 2 feet to a larger 4+ feet (gold and blue tegus being the smallest and the red and Argentine black and white being the largest) and have a pleasant nature, making them popular pets. Tegus are also recognized for their intelligence, and have an impressive ability to remember details.[citation needed]

Most tegus are opportunistic feeders, accepting a wide variety of foods. Tegus' diets can consist of crickets, mealworms, an occasional mouse, fish, hard boiled eggs, chicken, etc. Certain fruits and vegetables may be offered as well (for example, strawberries, mangoes, papayas, bananas) but usually will only be eaten by the red or Argentinian black and white tegus. The Colombian tegus tend to be almost entirely carnivores/insectivores.

Dairy products should never be given to reptiles, since, like all other non-mammalian creatures, they lack the ability to digest lactose (only mammals can).

Also, dog food should only be offered in strict moderation to thin, underdeveloped, or sick animals, and only for a limited time. Dog food contains many ingredients that are not meant for lizard consumption, and is also very fatty. In addition, all tegus need size-appropriate housing with UVA and UVB light setups, maintaining a steady enclosure temperature of 80 F–90 F during the day and at about 75F during the night.

Because tegus, like all lizards, are ectothermic, a temperature gradient will allow them to find the perfect location for their needs, so they also need a spot for basking with a temperature of 100F-110F. This can mean that a variable number of "warm spots" are needed in a housing; so the animal can comfortably move between them, as often as necessary, the number depending mostly on the local climate.
[edit] Hibernation

Tegus naturally go into a hibernation cycle. It has been discovered that this is not needed to maintain their health, but it may have adverse effects on sexual development if their first years' hibernation is skipped.

Cuban Knight Anole
Out of stock


Originally from Cuba, but now spread to the USA, the Cuban Knight Anole (Anolis equestris) is the largest of all anole species. They are also known as just Knight Anole, or somtimes mistakingly as Night Anole.

Captive Care Information


Food & Water

The Knight Anole will eat feeder insects: crickets, mealworms, waxworms, butterworms (teboworms), flies, and sometimes even earthworms. Make sure to dust, or gut load, your insects with a calcium/multi-vitamin supplement. Provide your insects with some fruit as well, as the natural vitamins found in the fruit will also help your Knight Anole. These lizards have also been known to eat fruit from time to time. You could try leaving a bit of fruit baby food on a dish as well.

Mist the enclosure twice a day, as they will drink the mist off the leaves. You can also use a drip system. Some may even learn to drink from a shallow dish. If you do include one, make sure the dish is very heavy, and shallow, to avoid injury. If it is light, your Knight Anole could flip the dish onto itself and possibly be hurt. It is extremely important to wash the dish and provide clean water every day.
Lighting, Temperature & Humidity

Keep the temperature during the day around 83 to 90 degrees F. At night, you can reduce the temperature to 75 to 80 degrees F. The Knight Anole lives in warm temperatures year round, and do not tolerate the cold. Do not let the temperatures drop below 75 degrees F. A broad-spectrum heat bulb and full-spectrum fluorescent lighting should be provided to obtain the proper temperatures and vitamin intake.

Keep the humidity around 80 - 90% as Knight Anoles come from semi-humid areas.

Housing


Knight Anoles prefer to climb, and they usually do when threatened. Give them a large habitat, preferably higher than wide. A 2' wide x 2' deep x 4' high enclosure would do nicely. Make sure to include many items for your Knight Anole to climb on and over.

Use a fully digestible substrate, as they will sometimes consume parts of the ground while hunting insects. If they cannot digest the ground material, it may lead to impaction. If you provide a fully screened enclosure, they will climb on the walls as well.

Never house two Knight Anole's together. These lizards are extremely territorial and hostile. Putting them together will cause undue stress, which may lead to health complications. They will also fight each other.

Jackson Chameleon
Out of stock


The Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii) is a medium chameleon species originally from Kenya and Tanzania in East Africa. More recently, this species has been introduced and has established populations on most of the Hawaiian islands and some other areas. In its natural range, the Jackson's Chameleon lives in cool, humid mountain slopes with significant rainfall and vegetation.

Jackson's Chameleons are a mid-sized species, which are easily recognized by the three annulated horns of males like a Triceratops. There are three subspecies of Jackson's Chameleon: the Standard Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii jacksonii), the Mt. Kenya Yellow-crested Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii xantholophus), and the Mt. Meru or Dwarf Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii merumontanus).

The Standard Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii jacksonii) is the rarest subspecies in the US. They are from Kenya and reach a total length of approximately 10 inches. Males have three horns while females can have a single horn on the nose or three like the male.

The Mt. Kenya Yellow-crested Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii xantholophus) is the most common subspecies in the US. This subspecies is originally from Kenya but has been introduced to various places in the US, as previously mentioned. They can reach a total length of up to approximately 14 inches. Males have three horns while females typically have no horns but have been known to exhibit a single horn on the nose.

The Mt. Meru or Dwarf Jackson's Chameleon (Chamaeleo jacksonii merumontanus) is a fairly readily available subspecies but not as common as Ch. j. xantholophus. This subspecies is from Tanzania and reaches a total length of approximately 8 inches. The males have three long, narrow horns while the females have a single horn on the nose. This species typically has bright yellow crests.

All three subspecies have similar care requirements and adults typically exhibit a green coloration with darker patterning. This species is known to live upwards of 9+ years with females being slightly shorter lived then males. A common misconception with chameleons is that they are very difficult animals to keep in captivity. Fortunately, captive bred Jackson's chameleons purchased from a reputable breeder are actually quite hardy when provided with consistent care and a proper enclosure. In the past, it was difficult to obtain chameleons that were not wild caught. These wild caught chameleons are difficult to acclimate to captivity and often did poorly, even for experienced reptile keepers. Now that dedicated, reputable chameleon breeders are reliably producing high quality Jackson's chameleons, this stigma is no longer an issue.

Jackson's Chameleons do well in captive environments with consistent care but are more challenging to keep then either Panther or Veiled Chameleons. The first step toward successfully keeping your chameleon happy and healthy is to set up their enclosure. Jackson's Chameleons do best in screen sided enclosures because of the increased airflow. Glass tanks, on the other hand, are difficult to find in appropriate sizes and create stagnant air, which can lead to upper respiratory infections. With adult chameleons, the general rule is that bigger is better as far as their enclosure is concerned. Adults would ideally be housed in a screen enclosure around 18" x 18" x 3' tall, although they can tolerate somewhat smaller enclosures. Babies and juveniles can be kept in smaller screen enclosures (16" x 16" x 30") until they are approximately 10-12 months old, at which point they will need to be moved into a larger enclosure. If you are purchasing a baby, it is best to start with a small enclosure and then move up to a larger cage when the animal gets older. Finally, it is generally best to keep chameleons individually after they reach sexual maturity at around 10-12 months old to avoid potential stress and fighting.

The interior of the enclosure should be furnished with medium sized vines and ample foliage for the chameleons to hide in. The medium sized vines provide important horizontal perches for the chameleon to rest, bask and travel on. Synthetic plants with plastic leaves (not silk) can be used in conjunction with common, non-toxic plants to provide ample foliage. Commonly used non-toxic plants that can be used include Ficus, Schefflera, Hibiscus and Pothos. These live plants not only provide cover but they also help to maintain humidity inside the enclosure. The bottom of the enclosure should not have a substrate as substrates can cause impaction, provide a hiding place for feeders and harbor bacteria and fungus. Instead the floor of the enclosure can be kept bare or have a layer of paper towels, which should be changed regularly.

Jackson's Chameleons need two forms of light for approximately 12 hours a day. First, they need access to a light heat source to bask and regulate their body temperature. Heat rocks, heat tape, ceramic heat emitters, etc., do not provide chameleons with a heat source they recognize so it is important to provide them with a basking spot using a heat bulb and an incandescent fixture. Next, they need a special fluorescent bulb that provides UVB light waves. UVB, which is usually provided by natural sunlight, is important in calcium metabolism pathways but is filtered out by glass and therefore must be provided by artificial lights to help prevent disorders such as Metabolic Bone Disease (MBD). As tempting as many bulbs that provide both UVB and heat may be, studies have shown that chameleons are able to regulate their body temperature and their UVB exposure independently so it is important to provide heat and UVB separately. Both these lights should be placed on the top of the enclosure with the closest perches approximately 8-10" below.

Jackson's Chameleons, like other reptiles regulate their own body temperature and it is thus important to provide them with a temperature gradient inside their enclosure. The best ambient temperature during the day for Jackson's Chameleons is fairly cool, between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. By placing the basking bulb approximately 8-10 inches away from a basking perch inside the enclosure, a basking spot of approximately 80-85 degrees Fahrenheit is achieved. This arrangement provides the warmest temperatures directly under the heat bulb and cooler temps lower down in the enclosures. Additionally, chameleons do well with a night temperature drop so no additional heat source is needed at night as long as your temps stay above the mid to high 40s and the chameleons are able to bask in the morning. If your night temperatures do necessitate a heat source, it is important not to use one that emits light. Instead, a ceramic heat emitter should be utilized from a safe distance.

Being arboreal, Jackson's chameleons do not typically encounter standing water such as a water dish. As a result, they typically do not recognize water dishes as a source of water for hydration. They drink water from morning dew and rain as it falls onto leaves. As a result, it is important to mist your Jackson's Chameleon with a spray bottle two to three times a day for approximately two minutes getting all the leaves and branches wet in the enclosure. Your chameleon will lap water up from the leaves. You can also create a drip system to provide water over a prolonged period. By taking a clean plastic water jug and poking a couple small holes in the bottom, water will slowly drip out over a period of time and fall onto leaves in the enclosure below. Finally, while waterfalls may seem like a nice addition to an enclosure and like they would help with humidity, chameleons are attracted to moving water sources to defecate. As a result, waterfalls quickly before cesspools filled with bacteria and can be extremely detrimental to your chameleon's health.

Jackson's Chameleons can be fed a staple diet of crickets. In general, crickets should be as long as your chameleon's head is wide. Newborn Jackson's Chameleons feed on fruit flies. Baby and juvenile Jackson's Chameleons should be fed once or twice a day and have almost constant access to food. As they get older, you can feed slightly less often with adults being fed every other day. It is important to supplement your crickets with calcium and vitamins (Reptivite) to help promote proper growth and health but care should be taken to not over do supplements. This is especially important for reproductive females and growing babies and juveniles. For babies and juveniles you will need to dust your crickets with calcium once or twice times a week and dust with vitamins once every two to three weeks. As adults, this dusting regiment can be decreased. It also helps to provide your crickets with nutritious food including collard greens, mustard greens, squash, orange and/or commercial cricket diets.

It is important to keep in mind that Jackson's Chameleons do best as primarily display animals. While different Jackson's chameleons will tolerate handling to different degrees based on their individual personality, Jackson's chameleons should not be handled like a bearded dragon. They can be carefully held for short periods but tend to get stressed with excess handling. With time you will learn what your Jackson's chameleon's personality is like and what your chameleon will tolerate. When you do handle your Jackson's chameleon, do not restrain it but rather let the chameleon walk on you from hand to hand. You should be aware that Jackson's chameleons are most comfortable when they are high up so often times when they are being held, they will attempt to walk up your arm and try to go onto your head. For long-term success with all chameleon species, limited handling is recommended.

With the proper setup and consistent care, your Jackson's Chameleon should do very well. The Jackson's Chameleon is a striking and beautiful captive, which is excellent for the moderately experienced chameleon owner. Their slightly more advanced care requirements, impressive features and odd behavior make them an interesting and conversation starting display for any dedicated enthusiast.

COMMON CHAMELEON
Out of stock


Chameleons (family Chamaeleonidae) are a distinctive and highly specialized clade of lizards. They are distinguished by their parrot-like zygodactylous feet, their separately mobile and stereoscopic eyes, their very long, highly modified, and rapidly extrudable tongues, their swaying gait, the possession by many of a prehensile tail, crests or horns on their distinctively shaped heads, and the ability of some to change color. Uniquely adapted for climbing and visual hunting, the approximately 160 species of chameleon range from Africa, Madagascar, Spain and Portugal, across south Asia, to Sri Lanka, have been introduced to Hawaii, California and Florida, and are found in warm habitats that vary from rain forest to desert conditions. Chameleons are often kept as household pets.

Distribution and habitat
The tiny, usually brown-colored Brookesia chameleons are mainly terrestrial

Chameleons are primarily found in the mainland of sub-Saharan Africa and on the island of Madagascar, although a few species are also found in northern Africa, southern Europe, the Middle East, southern India, Sri Lanka and several smaller islands in the western Indian Ocean. There are introduced, feral populations of veiled and Jackson's chameleons in Hawaii and isolated pockets of feral Jackson's chameleons have been reported in California and Florida.

Chameleons inhabit all kinds of tropical and mountain rain forests, savannas and sometimes deserts and steppes. The typical chameleons from the subfamily Chamaeleoninae are arboreal and usually found in trees or bushes, although a few (notably the Namaqua Chameleon) are partially or largely terrestrial. Most species from the subfamily Brookesiinae, which includes the genera Brookesia, Rieppeleon and Rhampholeon, live low in vegetation or on the ground among leaf litter.

Chameleons are mostly oviparous, some being ovoviviparous.

The oviparous species lay eggs 3–6 weeks after copulation. The female will climb down to the ground and begin digging a hole, anywhere from 10–30 cm (4–12 in.) deep depending on the species. The female turns herself around at the bottom of the hole and deposits her eggs. Clutch sizes vary greatly with species. Small Brookesia species may only lay 2–4 eggs, while large Veiled Chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) have been known to lay clutches of 80–100 eggs. Clutch sizes can also vary greatly among the same species. Eggs generally hatch after 4–12 months, again depending on species. The eggs of Parson's Chameleon (Calumma parsonii), a species which is rare in captivity, are believed to take upwards of 24 months to hatch.

The ovoviviparous species, such as the Jackson's Chameleon (Trioceros jacksonii) have a 5–7 month gestation period. Each young chameleon is born within the sticky transparent membrane of its yolk sac. The mother presses each egg onto a branch, where it sticks. The membrane bursts and the newly born chameleon frees itself and climbs away to hunt for itself and hide from predators. The female can have up to 30 live young from one gestation.

Diet

Chameleons generally eat insects, but larger species such as the Common Chameleon may also take other lizards and young birds. The range of diets can be seen from the following examples:

   The Veiled Chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus from Arabia, is insectivorous, but eats leaves when other sources of water are not available. It can be maintained on a diet of Crickets.

   Jackson's Chameleon (Trioceros jacksonii) from Kenya and northern Tanzania eats a wide variety of small animals including ants, butterflies, caterpillars, snails, worms, lizards, geckos, amphibians and other chameleons, as well as plant material such as leaves, tender shoots, and berries. It can be maintained on a mixed diet including kale, dandelion leaves, lettuce, bananas, tomatoes, apples, crickets and waxworms.

   The Common Chameleon of Europe, North Africa, and the Near East, Chamaeleo chamaeleon, mainly eats wasps and mantises; such arthropods form over three quarters of its diet.[11]:5 Some experts advise that the Common Chameleon should not be fed exclusively on Crickets: these should make up no more than half the diet, with the rest a mixture of waxworms, earthworms, grasshoppers, flies and plant materials such as green leaves, oats and fruit

VEILED CHAMELEON
In stock


The veiled chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus, is a large species of chameleon found in the mountain regions of Yemen, United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. It is also sometimes referred to as the Yemen Chameleon.

The male veiled chameleon is green in color and, depending on the animal's emotional state, this green will range from a bright lime green to a red olive drab. Surroundings only partly contribute to a chameleon's "decision" to change color. The green base color is marked with stripes and spots of yellow, brown, and blue. Non-breeding females and juvenile chameleons are generally a uniform green color with some white markings. Breeding and gravid females are a very dark green with blue and yellow spots. The prominence of these markings is dependent on several factors including health, mood, and temperature of the lizard.

Male chameleons of the species have small spurs or heels on the back their rear feet; while females do not. This spur is present on males from hatching, and can grow larger with maturity. Adult male Veiled chameleons are relatively large for reptiles. It is possible for them to reach an overall length of 24 inches (60 cm). Most specimens usually reach between 14 to 18 inches (35–45 cm). Females are smaller with the average overall length being just under 12 inches (30 cm). Males and females both have a decorative growth called a "casque" on their heads. The casque of a male chameleon is much taller than the female's.

Like most chameleons, veiled chameleons are specialized tree dwellers. They have a flattened body meant to mimic a leaf and feet specially designed for grasping limbs and branches. They have a prehensile tail that acts as a fifth appendage and aids in climbing. Their eyes work independently of one another allowing the chameleon to look in front of and behind itself at the same time. They have a long sticky tongue that they use to capture their insect prey. Veiled chameleons are ambush predators and are capable of lying still for very long periods of time waiting for an unsuspecting locust to wander by.
An adult female, with a relatively small casque
Veiled Chameleon P9240100.JPG

Veiled chameleons are omnivores. While their main diet consists of insects, they will occasionally consume the leaves, blossoms, and fruit of various plants. This is especially true in times of drought when water is scarce. Like all chameleons, veiled chameleons prefer to drink water that is in drops or on leaves. They do not always recognize standing water and may dehydrate if that is their only source.

Female veiled chameleons can produce up to three clutches of eggs a year, as early from 4–6 months of age. Each clutch may contain 20–70 eggs. The eggs dissimilar to chickens. They retain sperm, which is why they lay so many clutches. Egg-laying sand must be provided for mature females in an incubated bucket or etc. with approximately 8-10 inches of organic garden soil, or they can die of egg binding.

Veiled chameleons are often kept in captivity because they are hearty when compared to other chameleon species often offered for sale. Like most old-world chameleons, they must be kept individually in a screened enclosure, and provided with a basking light, and a source of UVB/UVA light.

COLLARED LIZARD
Out of stock


COLLARED LIZARD
Crotaphytus collaris, C. reticulatus, C. bicinctores
Origin: Central North America to Mexico.
Family:

This medium-large sized lizard can achieve a total length of 35cm. This species has a stout body, with a large broad head. Its legs are large and powerful enabling it to flee when threatened, running rapidly on its hind legs for fairly long distances. Its powerful hind legs also make it a good jumper. Its markings are highly variable and are temperature dependent. The females are more dully coloured being grey/peach, with white speckling. The males are stunning colours for green-turquoise, and yellow. Both sexes have a collar of black bands around the neck with white inter-space. Its scales are very small giving it a smooth feel.

In its native environment this lizard can be found on rocky out crops and gorges in the Texas-Mexican desert.

In captivity the collared lizard requires a spacious cage, the bigger the better, as mentioned this species has powerful hind legs and in a small environment will quickly damage itself. The substrate should be sand, rock basking platforms should be placed at the back of the cage built up to form crevices for rest making sure these are secure as collard lizards can also dig well. Collard lizards require hot temperature and can withstand temperatures of 45°C. The daytime temeparature should be between 37°C and 39°C. A well-defined night drop of 5 or more degrees is required. Due to its desert environment a strong (5.0 – 8.0) UV emitting lamp must be used for a period of 8-10 hours a day. Male collared lizards are highly territorial and two males should never be housed together.
Food can consist of all suitably sized commercially produced live foods, and hedge sweeping, remember to only collect from areas you are sure pesticides have not been used. Fruit and chopped salads will also be taken. In the wild collared lizards will eat just about anything that moves including other lizards and snakes. Never house smaller lizard species with collared lizards preferably don’t mix this species with other species.

Collard lizards are egg-layers, having clutches of up to 24 eggs and usually two clutches in a season. Collard lizards hibernate in the wild and a dormancy period is required for breeding purposes.

Overall this lizard is a hardy captive as long as its requirements are met. Captive animals can li

Green Basilisk
Out of stock

The plumed basilisk, Basiliscus plumifrons, also called a green basilisk, double crested basilisk, or Jesus Christ lizard, is a species of corytophanid to Latin America

Taxonomy and etymology

The plumed basilisk's generic name Basiliscus is taken from the legendary reptilian creature of European mythology which could turn a man to stone by its gaze: the Basilisk.[2] This name derives from the Greek basilískos (βασιλίσκος) meaning "little king".This epithet was given in Carolus Linnaeus' 10th edition of Systema Naturae.[2]
Description

Plumed basilisks are bright green with small bluish spots along the dorsal ridge. These lizards may grow up to 3 ft (1 m) in length (most of which is tail), with an average length of about 2 ft (0.6 m). Males have three crests: one on the head, one on their back, and one on the tail. The females, however, only have one crest, on the head.
[edit] Diet

Plumed basilisks are omnivorous and eat insects, small mammals (such as rodents), smaller species of lizards, fruits and flowers. Their predators include birds of prey, opossums and snakes.

Reproduction

The females of this species lay five to fifteen eggs at a time in warm, damp sand or soil. The eggs hatch after eight to ten weeks, at which point the young emerge as fully independent lizards.

Males are very territorial; a single male may keep land containing a large group of females with whom he mates. Most basilisks are skittish and do not tolerate much handling.

This lizard is able to run short distances across water using both its feet and tail for support, an ability shared with other basilisks and the Malaysian sail-finned lizard, Hydrosaurus amboinensis. In Costa Rica, this has earned the plumed basilisk the nickname "Jesus Christ lizard". It is also an excellent swimmer and can stay under water for up to 30 minutes.

Pueblan Milk Snake
In stock


DESCRIPTION:

The Pueblan Milk Snake is a constrictor native to Puebla, Morelos, Oaxaca MEXICO

The Pueblan Milk Snake is a medium sized Milk Snake with a fairly stocky build which averages 3 feet in length.
It is known as a tri-coloured Milk Snake due to the 3 bands of red, black and white running the length of its body.
The Pueblan Milk Snake is a nervous species but prefers to retreat as its first defense, rarely bites and is relatively easy to care for.
These snakes will live 10 to 20 years in captivity with the proper care.

HOUSING


An enclosure measuring 30”x12”x12” is suitable for housing the Pueblan Milk Snake. The enclosure can be a wooden vivarium with sliding glass doors or an aquarium with a well ventilated secure lid. Being a mainly terrestrial species they are also successfully kept in large plastic storage boxes with plenty of ventilation holes drilled in the sides. Whatever type of enclosure you choose for housing your Pueblan, you must ensure it is secure and escape proof. Milk snakes are superb escape artists.

Pueblan Milk Snakes are nervous, shy creatures and should be provided with plenty of places to hide within the enclosure. Pieces of cork bark or hollow logs are ideal. You can also buy hides specially made for reptiles at many pet shops.


Milk snakes like to burrow and a suitable substrate should be used to line the floor of the enclosure to reflect this characteristic. Aspen bedding or coconut fibre are ideal substrates for Pueblan Milksnakes. Cocunut fibre can be bought in compressed blocks. (Eco Earth substrate block)

A sturdy water bowl placed near the coolest part of the enclosure is essential and should be large enough for the snake to bathe in if it wishes.

Any cage furnishings (hides, branches, plants etc.) should be securely anchored if you want them to remain where you placed them, as Pueblan Milk Snakes have a tendency to rearrange everything while you sleep.

HEATING, LIGHTING AND TEMPERATURE:


Pueblan Milk snakes are best kept at daytime temperatures varying from 31 to 33 degrees centigrade at one end of the enclosure and 24 to 26 degrees centigrade at the other. A temperature drop of 5 or 6 degrees can be allowed at night.

A thermal gradient like this can be achieved by placing a heat mat under only half of the enclosure, leaving the other half cool. Heat mats should be controlled by a thermostat to maintain correct temperatures. Always follow the instructions that come with your heating equipment as these can vary between manufacturer.

If you find that extra heat is needed a low wattage bulb fitted to the ceiling of the enclosure can be used to increase temperature. Bulbs used for heating or lighting your Pueblan Milk Snakes vivarium that are above 15 watts should be covered with a bulb guard to protect your snake from burns.

Any lighting should be turned off at night. An inexpensive timer can be used to do the job for you.
Lighting is not a necessity if your snake is kept in a room with a window but can make your vivarium more attractive.

FEEDING:


Pueblan Milk Snakes can be fed on an appropriately sized mouse or rat once every week and the food offered should be roughly the thickness of the snake at the centre of its length, although several small food items are often preferred to one large one. Milk snakes are best fed at dusk or after nightfall.

Milk snakes are quite shy and may not always take food from tongs. Just leave the mouse in front of it's hide and leave the room for an hour or so to allow the snake to eat in privacy.

All the Suplies for sale at Bestpet for you Palm Beach Florida

HANDLING:


Pueblan Milk Snakes are suitable for handling and rarely bite, just don't expect this snake to settle for any length of time. Keep a close eye on your Milk Snake if you allow it to wander as it is amazing how quickly it will disappear if it finds a small dark hole such as the side of a sofa cushion.


GENERAL MAINTENANCE:


Your Pueblan Milk Snakes enclosure should be spot checked for faeces on a daily basis and cleaned out completely with a reptile-safe disinfectant at least monthly. All cage furniture should also be disinfected and the substrate should be changed.

Your Milk Snake should be given fresh water at least twice weekly as part of your care regime.
Cleanliness and hygiene are an essential part of your care regime and will help keep your Pueblan Milk Snake healthy and disease free.

Central America Boa
CA Red tail bod in stock


General Information:

Wild Boas (Boa constrictor) are found throughout central and south america. Most of the boa constrictors in the pet trade are descendants from the variety found in Colombia and central america, often called Colombian or Central American Boas (Both are B. c. imperator). There are many other boas available as well, most of which are the same species but different subspecies because they have evolved into a variety of colors, patterns and sizes depending on their native locality. Some other popular varieties that are often commonly available are True Red-tail Boas from Peru, Guyana, Colombia and Suriname (All are B. c. constrictor), Island Boas such as the Hog Island Boa or the Cay Caulker Boa (Both are B. c. imperator) and Argentine Boas (Boa constrictor occidentalis). Boas are generally found in the humid jungles that exist throughout south and central america, surviving mainly on a diet of rodents and birds. Most boas reach sizes around 8 ft but there are varieties that range in adult size from 4 ft (Central American Boas) to as much as 12+ feet (True Red-tails). Boas can live as long as 30 years with record ages being as high as 40.

Boas As Pets:


Boas are probably the perfect pet for someone who wants an easy, exotic, friendly pet. They reach average sizes of 6-10 ft making them extremely impressive yet still manageable for a single individual. Even as babies they are usually extremely tame and even the most nippy individuals can be tamed with minimal handling. They eat only once a week but it is important that the owner is comfortable with the idea of feeding their boa mice, rats or even rabbits or chickens eventually.

Housing:

A twenty gallon terrarium is an excellent starter size for a baby boa. This size tank will last about a year. Most boas ultimately will need a cage six feet long and about 15-24 inches high. Smaller boas, such as the Central American Boa or the Cay Caulker Boa, can be kept in a smaller four foot long terrarium.

Substrate:

The best choice for a boa cage in Arizona is bark. Many books and even some breeders who are based in more humid areas will recommend aspen or newspaper but it tends to be too dry. Reptibark®, Eco Earth®, or Cypress mulch all make great choices. They will all absorb moisture when misted and help keep the terrarium humid.

Heating:

The ambient air temperature in a boa enclosure should be between 80-85 degrees F during the day. At night, the enclosure should not be allowed to drop lower than 78 degrees. The basking spot should be 95-100 degrees. As long as your boa is in a room where it is light enough to have a day and night cycle, fluorescent lighting is not necessary. Heat bulbs or ceramic heat emitters are usually best for daytime lighting. Heat pads, nocturnal bulbs, ceramic heat emitters or a combination of the three can be used at night. For more details on heating options see our Heating and Lighting FAQ.

Feeding:

When feeding your boa, it is a good idea to have a separate feeding cage. This can simply be a plastic shoe box for small ones or a larger Rubbermaid® container for adults. It is also best to leave the feeding cage free of bedding to prevent accidental ingestion. Snakes who are routinely fed in their terrariums will develop feeding responses and may go for your nice warm hand reaching in, thinking that it’s food instead. Having a separate feeding cage will eliminate this unpleasant possibility. Baby boas should start off eating large fuzzy mice. After a few feedings, they can graduate to adult mice. It is best to feed one to two mice once a week when they are young. A good rule to keep in mind is to purchase prey animals that are about the same to slightly larger girth as the largest part of the snake. When the boa is two or three feet long, it is usually time to switch to small rats. Adult Red Tails will eat at least a jumbo rat and many will eventually eat small-medium rabbits or guinea pigs. Young adults can be fed every other week one or two prey items. Large adults can eat every two or three weeks depending on how big the meal is.

Black and White Striped California King Snake
Out of stock

General Information:
Desert king snakes are found throughout Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and parts of Mexico. Desert kings come from a semi arid environment and their cage should be set up similar to their natural habitat. These king snakes reach adulthood within 3 years and grow to 3-5 feet. Adult female desert kings will lay 1-2 clutches each year with 5-10 eggs per clutch. The eggs are incubated at 82-84 degrees and will hatch in 50-90 days. Desert king snakes are secretive snakes and will do best if provided with some type of hiding place. With proper care you can expect your king snake to live 10-20 years or more.
 
Temperature:
Desert king snakes need to be maintained between 84-90 degrees during the day. Nighttime temperatures should range between 68-75 degrees. If you keep your snake too cool it can regurgitate, so make sure the temperatures are maintained.

Housing:
King snakes can be housed comfortably in a 29-40 gallon terrarium as adults. Ideally, the larger the snake, the more room you want to provide. Never place a cage near a window where sunlight can directly shine on your cage. Cages placed in direct sunlight can easily overheat and ultimately lead to the death of your snake. Never house your king snake with other snakes, it may eat them.
 
Substrate:
Almost any type of bedding can be used for king snakes. We recommend using carpet, bark, pine shavings, or aspen shavings NO Cedar. A deep layer is recommended to allow your snake to hide if it chooses to do so.

Feeding:
King snakes feed on pinky and fuzzy mice as babies and juveniles. As your snake grows it will soon move up to adult mice. We recommend that you feed baby and juvenile king snakes one time per week. Adult king snakes can be fed once every 7-10 days to maintain proper body weight. Like most snakes, king snakes typically will not eat when they are preparing to shed. After your snake has shed you can return to your normal feeding regiment. Do Not leave live prey in the cage alone with your snake.

Breeding: A three month cooling off period where the temperature remains between 55 – 65 degrees F is required to get the best results from your breeding kingsnakes

Carpet Python
In stock


Morelia spilota is a large snake of the Pythonidae family found in Australia, Indonesia and New Guinea. There are 6 subspecies listed by ITIS, commonly referred to as carpet pythons and diamond pythons.


Morelia spilota is a large species of python in the genus Morelia, reaching between 2 to 4 metres (6.5 to 13 feet) in length and weighing up to 15 kilograms (33 lb). M. s. mcdowelli is the largest subspecies, regularly attaining lengths of 2.7–3 m (9–10 feet).[4] M. s. variegata is the smallest subspecies, averaging 120–180 cm (4-6) feet in length. The average adult length is roughly 2 m (6.5 ft). However, one 3-year-old captive male M. s. mcdowelli, measured in Ireland, was found to exceed 396 cm (13 ft). Males are typically smaller than females; in some regions females are up to four times heavier.[4] The head is triangular with a conspicuous row of thermoreceptive labial pits.

The colouring of Morelia spilota spilota is highly variable, olive to black with white or cream and gold markings. The patterning may be roughly diamond shaped or have intricate markings made up of light and dark bands on a background of gray or a version of brown.

Reproduction

The species is oviparous, with females laying 10-50 eggs at a time. Afterwards, females coil around the eggs to protect them and keep them warm through using muscular contractions to generate heat. This type of maternal care, which is typical for pythons, ceases once the hatchlings have emerged.

Behaviour

Described as semi-arboreal, they are largely nocturnal, climbing trees and shrubs as well as crossing open areas such as rock faces, forest floors and even roads. However, basking behaviour is commonly observed.
Diet

The diet consists mainly of small mammals, bats, birds and lizards. Morelia spilota kills prey by constricting it until it suffocates. It is often the largest predator in its ecological community.

Geographic range

The species is found throughout mainland Australia, with the exception of the arid centre and the western regions. It is widely distributed throughout the forest regions of Southwest Australia.[5] It is also found in Indonesia (southern Western New Guinea in Merauke Regency), Papua New Guinea (southern Western Province, the Port Moresby area of Central Province and on Yule Island) and ). The type locality given is "Nouvelle-Hollande" [Australia].


Habitat

Occurs in a wide variety of habitats, from the rainforests of northeastern Queensland (M. s. cheynei) through the River Red Gum/Riverbox woodlands of the Murray and Darling Rivers (M. s. metcalfei), to the arid, treeless islands of the Nuyts Archipelago off the South Australian west coast (M. s. imbricata). Often found near human habitation where they perform a useful service by eating rats and other vermin. M. s. spilota is even know to occur in areas that receive snowfall. Morelia spilota are tree snakes; they do not completely rely on trees, however, and are capable of moving around elsewhere. Carpet pythons are also found in temperate grasslands with hot and dry weather.

Conservation

The nominate subspecies, Morelia spilota spilota, is listed as threatened with extinction in Victoria.[7] The subspecies M. spilota imbricata is regarded as near threatened in Western Australia, due to loss of habitat.[5]

Captivity

This species is a popular pet among enthusiasts. Some forms can be more irascible than others, such as M. s. mcdowelli and M. s. variegata. Forms that tend to be more even tempered include M. s. spilota and M. s. metcalfei. However this is not a hard rule. Although they can grow to a reasonable size (2-3.5 m) and can be nippy as hatchlings, most will grow into docile adults. However, care must be taken when feeding, as these snakes have a strong "feeding response", behaviour that can be mistaken for aggression. Captive specimens are normally fed live or frozen rats. They may have a lifespan of 15 to 20 years.

The care requirements can be generalised for all subspecies.[8] The subspecies Morela spilota spilota, the cold weather Diamond python, has some separate requirements and habits

Green tree python
In stock


Green Tree Python (Morelia viridis)
Green tree pythons are definitely one of the reptile hobby’s rising stars. As their common name suggests, these snakes spend a great deal of time in trees. But they are not always green. They come in a wide array of colors found in both wild and captive-bred designer forms. Only one recessive morph, the albino, currently exists.

Juvenile green tree pythons are typically yellow, red or dark brown-black. As they mature, their color changes to the bright green many adults display. Some individuals keep their bright-yellow juvenile colors, and some turn straight to blue. Each color is unique and stunning in its own way. Watching the color change is one of the most exciting things about owning these beautiful snakes.

Green Tree Python Size

Hatchling green tree pythons usually measure between 8 and 10 inches long. Adults average between 4 and 6 feet, with males on the lower end of this scale and females on the upper end. Males are typically more slender than females as well.

Green Tree Python Life Span

Most green tree pythons can be expected to live into their mid-teens with good care. A few have even made it into their mid-20s.

Green Tree Python Caging

House green tree pythons in cages providing easy viewing so you can really enjoy their beauty. Many front-opening plastic and glass enclosures can be outfitted to accommodate the needs of these arboreal snakes. You may need to cover a portion of the screen top to help maintain the proper humidity level.

Juveniles can be shy, so it’s best to start them off in smaller enclosures measuring 1 foot long, 1 foot wide and 1 foot tall. Adult green tree pythons make full use of the larger sizes, such as 2-feet-long-by-2-feet-wide-by-2-feet-tall enclosures or 3-feet-long-by-2-feet-wide-by-2-feet-tall enclosures.

One of the biggest misconceptions about green tree pythons and arboreal snakes is that their enclosures should be very tall. With tall cages these snakes typically select the highest perch and their water bowls are usually located on the cage floor. Sometimes, the python never comes down to drink and eventually suffers from dehydration. When green tree pythons become active, they crawl horizontally through the trees -- not up and down the trunks of trees. Horizontal space is far more valuable than vertical space. A good general rule is that the snake should be able to comfortably reach the bottom of the enclosure from the highest perch. Even though these animals spend most of their lives in trees, they make good use of horizontal space. When active, they spend their time crawling through tree branches and occasionally move from one level to another.

The enclosure should have sturdy resting branches or perches for the snake. A green tree python spends its days coiled on a perch with its head resting in the center of its coils. At night snakes become active and explore their surroundings. Multiple climbing branches of varying sizes help to provide variety and a more enriching environment. Be sure perches are securely fastened; otherwise a snake could be injured. Adding a few live plants will not only make the tank look nice and provide cover but also will help to create humid microclimates within the enclosure.

Green Tree Python Lighting and Temperature
Green tree pythons do not require full-spectrum lighting to metabolize calcium, but a quality full-spectrum lamp brings out all the vibrant colors in your pet. Because the day length in their natural habitat is nearly the same year round, you can provide 12 hours of light each day.

Tropical rain forests are the green tree python’s native habitat, so captive snakes need a warm and humid environment. Throughout their natural range they seldom experience temperatures below 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Offer a range of temperatures within the enclosure so the animal can select its ideal temperature. During the day provide an area where the animals can bask in a temperature between 86 and 88 degrees, and a retreat around 78 to 80 degrees. Allow a retreat, but not a place to hide. The retreat should be an area with lower ambient temperatures. Occasionally shy snakes, if given a lot of cover (hide areas), will remain hidden and not thermoregulate properly -- even to the point of becoming ill. At night the temperature throughout the enclosure can drop a few degrees, but it should not go below 70 to 72 degrees.

The humidity
range for green tree pythons should be 40 to 70 percent. It can be higher for short periods – such as after a misting – but should be thoroughly dry between mistings. The environment should not be constantly wet as it can cause the snake to develop dermal infections.

Green Tree Python Substrate

Many substrates are suitable for green tree python enclosures. Newspaper is easy to clean, but it’s not aesthetically pleasing for some people. Many snakekeepers use various mulches or coconut-husk products because they are pleasing to the eye and also help provide the humidity to keep these animals healthy. Dampened mulch or coconut husk can usually hold moisture for several days. Spot-clean such substrates as necessary, and completely clean the enclosure every few months to keep bacteria or mold in check.

Green Tree Python Food

Wild green tree pythons are arboreal predators, so captive specimens thrive on a diet of appropriately sized rodents. Feed juveniles a small mouse every five to seven days. Older juveniles and young adults can be fed a hopper or medium mouse every seven to 10 days. Adults can be given a meal of one or two adult mice, or a small rat every 10 to 14 days.

Be careful not to overfeed your green tree python. These naturally slender snakes have a sedentary lifestyle. They can easily become overweight, which can lead to health problems.

Green Tree Python Water

Wild green tree pythons experience rain showers nearly every day in their rain forest habitat. You can simulate these rain showers with spray bottles or misting systems. A gentle spray throughout the enclosure each day helps to encourage the animal to be active and seek out moisture. Be sure the enclosure can dry between sprayings to keep down any bacteria that may develop in a constantly warm and moist environment.

Often a green tree python drinks water droplets from the sides of the cage and its furnishings. It is wise to keep a bowl of clean, fresh water in the enclosure, too. Some snakes drink more readily from an elevated water bowl located near their perch.

Green Tree Python Handling and Temperament

Green tree pythons have gotten a bad rap over the years. They have a reputation of being aggressive, but for the most part this is untrue. Their attitude can be a reflection of how they’ve been treated. If they are grabbed, physically restrained and treated roughly, they will become defensive and appear aggressive when approached.

The best thing to do when you want to handle a green tree python is to remove the animal from its enclosure while it is still resting on its perch. Remain calm and deliberate in your movements regardless of how the animal reacts. It is best to approach the snake from below with your free hand. This is far less threatening than approaching from above. Gently support the snake’s lower coils, and allow it to begin leaving the perch voluntarily. Raise the coils with your hand as the python begins to leave the perch. Never pull the snake from its perch. Instead, offer it another secure perching location. With a gentle and calm approach most green tree pythons will tolerate handling for short periods.

Ball Python
In stock


Python regius
is a nonvenomous python species found in Africa. This is the smallest of the African pythons and is popular in the pet trade. No subspecies are currently recognized. They are also known as royal pythons or ball pythons. The name ball python refers to the animal's tendency to curl into a ball when stressed or frightened. The name royal python (from the Latin "regius") is based in part on the story that Cleopatra supposedly wore the snake around her wrist.

Description


Adults generally do not grow to more than 90–120 cm (3.0–3.9 ft) in length, although some specimens have reached 152 cm and even 182 cm (5–6 feet), but this is very rare.[5] Females tend to be slightly bigger than males maturing at an average of 4-4.5 feet. Males usually average around 3-3.5 feet.The build is stocky while the head is relatively small. The scales are smooth[5] and both sexes have anal spurs on either side of the vent. Although males tend to have larger spurs, this is not definitive, and sex is best determined via manual eversion of the male hemipenes or inserting a probe into the cloaca to find the inverted hemipenes (if male). When probing to determine sex, males typically measure eight to ten subcaudal scales, and females typically measure two to four subcaudal scales.

The color pattern is typically black or dark brown with light brown or gold sides and dorsal blotches. The belly is a white or cream that may include scattered black markings.[5] However, those in the pet industries have, through selective breeding, developed many morphs (genetic mutations) with altered colors and patterns.

Geographic range

Found in Africa from Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, Niger and Nigeria through Cameroon, Chad and the Central African Republic to Sudan and Uganda. No type locality was given in the original description.

Habitat


Prefers grasslands, savannas and sparsely wooded areas.

Behavior


This terrestrial species is known for its defense strategy that involves coiling into a tight ball when threatened, with its head and neck tucked away in the middle. In this state, it can literally be rolled around. Favored retreats include mammal burrows and other underground hiding places where they also aestivate. In captivity they are considered good pets, for their relatively small size and placid nature make them easy to handle. Captive bred adults rarely bite.

Feeding


In the wild, the diet consists mostly of small mammals, such as African soft-furred rats, shrews and striped mice. Younger individuals have also been known to feed on birds. Pythons that are imported from the wild tend to be picky eaters and may not respond to food as well as captive-bred pythons, which usually do well on domestic rats and mice, either live, pre-killed, or frozen-thawed.[5] The size of the prey item given to a python should be equivalent to or slightly larger than the width of the largest part of their body. This python is known for being a picky eater and may not eat for months, particularly during the winter breeding season. While this is not odd, care should be taken to watch that the snake does not experience significant weight loss. Parasites can also cause the snake to not eat. Other causes of not eating are stress caused by overhandling, or too hot or cold temperatures and not enough areas to hide in the vivarium.

Reproduction


Oviparous, with anywhere from 3-11 rather large, leathery eggs being laid (4-6 being most common).[5] These are incubated by the female under the ground and hatch after 55 to 60 days. Sexual maturity is reached at 11–18 months for males, 20–36 months for females. Age is only one factor in determining sexual maturity and ability to breed – weight is the second factor. Males will breed at 600 grams or more, but in captivity are often not bred until they are 800 grams (1.7 lbs.), and females will breed in the wild at weights as low as 800 grams, though 1200 grams or more is most common--in captivity, breeders generally wait until they are no less than 1500 g (3.3 lbs.). Parental care of the eggs ends once they hatch, and the female leaves the offspring to fend for themselves.

Captivity


These snakes are bred in captivity and are popular as pets, because of their small size (compared to other pythons) and their docile temperament.[11] Juveniles tend to be more aggressive at first, but typically calm down as they get used to human contact. Wild-caught specimens have greater difficulty adapting to a captive environment, which can result in refusal to feed, and they generally carry internal or external parasites which must be eliminated by administering anti-parasitic drugs. Specimens have survived for over 40 years in captivity, with the oldest recorded ball python being more than 48 years old.[12] [5] In captivity, most adult Python regius should be kept in a minimum of a 40 US gallons (150 L) long glass tank, as these pythons are ground dwellers and are highly secretive and largely sedentary. Some large females may require cages up to the 50 US gallons (190 L) long tank. Also, at least two hiding places should be provided at different ends of the tank, one should have a thermostat-controlled heating pad under it to allow the animal to regulate its temperature. Be aware that most snakes are escape artists, therefore the tank should have a locking lid. Juveniles in particular may be stressed by overly large cages that do not have sufficient small hiding spaces. For this reason, baby ball pythons do well in a 10 US gallons (38 L) or 15 US gallons (57 L) cage at first. Controlled temperatures of 80 °F (27 °C) with a 90 °F (32 °C) basking area on one end of the cage are necessary for proper health. Humidity should be maintained at 60% to 80% with dry substrate.

Pastel Ball Python
Out of stock


Python regius is a nonvenomous python species found in Africa. This is the smallest of the African pythons and is popular in the pet trade. No subspecies are currently recognized. They are also known as royal pythons or ball pythons. The name ball python refers to the animal's tendency to curl into a ball when stressed or frightened. The name royal python (from the Latin "regius") is based in part on the story that Cleopatra supposedly wore the snake around her wrist.

Description
Adults generally do not grow to more than 90–120 cm (3.0–3.9 ft) in length, although some specimens have reached 152 cm and even 182 cm (5–6 feet), but this is very rare.[5] Females tend to be slightly bigger than males maturing at an average of 4-4.5 feet. Males usually average around 3-3.5 feet.The build is stocky while the head is relatively small. The scales are smooth[5] and both sexes have anal spurs on either side of the vent. Although males tend to have larger spurs, this is not definitive, and sex is best determined via manual eversion of the male hemipenes or inserting a probe into the cloaca to find the inverted hemipenes (if male). When probing to determine sex, males typically measure eight to ten subcaudal scales, and females typically measure two to four subcaudal scales.

The color pattern is typically black or dark brown with light brown or gold sides and dorsal blotches. The belly is a white or cream that may include scattered black markings.[5] However, those in the pet industries have, through selective breeding, developed many morphs (genetic mutations) with altered colors and patterns.

Geographic range

Found in Africa from Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, Niger and Nigeria through Cameroon, Chad and the Central African Republic to Sudan and Uganda. No type locality was given in the original description.

Habitat

Prefers grasslands, savannas and sparsely wooded areas.

Behavior

This terrestrial species is known for its defense strategy that involves coiling into a tight ball when threatened, with its head and neck tucked away in the middle. In this state, it can literally be rolled around. Favored retreats include mammal burrows and other underground hiding places where they also aestivate. In captivity they are considered good pets, for their relatively small size and placid nature make them easy to handle. Captive bred adults rarely bite.

Feeding

In the wild, the diet consists mostly of small mammals, such as African soft-furred rats, shrews and striped mice. Younger individuals have also been known to feed on birds. Pythons that are imported from the wild tend to be picky eaters and may not respond to food as well as captive-bred pythons, which usually do well on domestic rats and mice, either live, pre-killed, or frozen-thawed.[5] The size of the prey item given to a python should be equivalent to or slightly larger than the width of the largest part of their body. This python is known for being a picky eater and may not eat for months, particularly during the winter breeding season. While this is not odd, care should be taken to watch that the snake does not experience significant weight loss. Parasites can also cause the snake to not eat. Other causes of not eating are stress caused by overhandling, or too hot or cold temperatures and not enough areas to hide in the vivarium.

Reproduction

Oviparous, with anywhere from 3-11 rather large, leathery eggs being laid (4-6 being most common).[5] These are incubated by the female under the ground and hatch after 55 to 60 days. Sexual maturity is reached at 11–18 months for males, 20–36 months for females. Age is only one factor in determining sexual maturity and ability to breed – weight is the second factor. Males will breed at 600 grams or more, but in captivity are often not bred until they are 800 grams (1.7 lbs.), and females will breed in the wild at weights as low as 800 grams, though 1200 grams or more is most common--in captivity, breeders generally wait until they are no less than 1500 g (3.3 lbs.). Parental care of the eggs ends once they hatch, and the female leaves the offspring to fend for themselves.

Captivity

These snakes are bred in captivity and are popular as pets, because of their small size (compared to other pythons) and their docile temperament.[11] Juveniles tend to be more aggressive at first, but typically calm down as they get used to human contact. Wild-caught specimens have greater difficulty adapting to a captive environment, which can result in refusal to feed, and they generally carry internal or external parasites which must be eliminated by administering anti-parasitic drugs. Specimens have survived for over 40 years in captivity, with the oldest recorded ball python being more than 48 years old.[12] [5] In captivity, most adult Python regius should be kept in a minimum of a 40 US gallons (150 L) long glass tank, as these pythons are ground dwellers and are highly secretive and largely sedentary. Some large females may require cages up to the 50 US gallons (190 L) long tank. Also, at least two hiding places should be provided at different ends of the tank, one should have a thermostat-controlled heating pad under it to allow the animal to regulate its temperature. Be aware that most snakes are escape artists, therefore the tank should have a locking lid. Juveniles in particular may be stressed by overly large cages that do not have sufficient small hiding spaces. For this reason, baby ball pythons do well in a 10 US gallons (38 L) or 15 US gallons (57 L) cage at first. Controlled temperatures of 80 °F (27 °C) with a 90 °F (32 °C) basking area on one end of the cage are necessary for proper health. Humidity should be maintained at 60% to 80% with dry substrate.

Spider Morph Ball Python
In stock


Python regius is a nonvenomous python species found in Africa. This is the smallest of the African pythons and is popular in the pet trade. No subspecies are currently recognized. They are also known as royal pythons or ball pythons. The name ball python refers to the animal's tendency to curl into a ball when stressed or frightened. The name royal python (from the Latin "regius") is based in part on the story that Cleopatra supposedly wore the snake around her wrist.

Description

Adults generally do not grow to more than 90–120 cm (3.0–3.9 ft) in length, although some specimens have reached 152 cm and even 182 cm (5–6 feet), but this is very rare.[5] Females tend to be slightly bigger than males maturing at an average of 4-4.5 feet. Males usually average around 3-3.5 feet.The build is stocky while the head is relatively small. The scales are smooth[5] and both sexes have anal spurs on either side of the vent. Although males tend to have larger spurs, this is not definitive, and sex is best determined via manual eversion of the male hemipenes or inserting a probe into the cloaca to find the inverted hemipenes (if male). When probing to determine sex, males typically measure eight to ten subcaudal scales, and females typically measure two to four subcaudal scales.

The color pattern is typically black or dark brown with light brown or gold sides and dorsal blotches. The belly is a white or cream that may include scattered black markings.[5] However, those in the pet industries have, through selective breeding, developed many morphs (genetic mutations) with altered colors and patterns.

Geographic range

Found in Africa from Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, Niger and Nigeria through Cameroon, Chad and the Central African Republic to Sudan and Uganda. No type locality was given in the original description.

Habitat


Prefers grasslands, savannas and sparsely wooded areas.

Behavior

This terrestrial species is known for its defense strategy that involves coiling into a tight ball when threatened, with its head and neck tucked away in the middle. In this state, it can literally be rolled around. Favored retreats include mammal burrows and other underground hiding places where they also aestivate. In captivity they are considered good pets, for their relatively small size and placid nature make them easy to handle. Captive bred adults rarely bite.

Feeding

In the wild, the diet consists mostly of small mammals, such as African soft-furred rats, shrews and striped mice. Younger individuals have also been known to feed on birds. Pythons that are imported from the wild tend to be picky eaters and may not respond to food as well as captive-bred pythons, which usually do well on domestic rats and mice, either live, pre-killed, or frozen-thawed.[5] The size of the prey item given to a python should be equivalent to or slightly larger than the width of the largest part of their body. This python is known for being a picky eater and may not eat for months, particularly during the winter breeding season. While this is not odd, care should be taken to watch that the snake does not experience significant weight loss. Parasites can also cause the snake to not eat. Other causes of not eating are stress caused by overhandling, or too hot or cold temperatures and not enough areas to hide in the vivarium.

Reproduction

Oviparous, with anywhere from 3-11 rather large, leathery eggs being laid (4-6 being most common).[5] These are incubated by the female under the ground and hatch after 55 to 60 days. Sexual maturity is reached at 11–18 months for males, 20–36 months for females. Age is only one factor in determining sexual maturity and ability to breed – weight is the second factor. Males will breed at 600 grams or more, but in captivity are often not bred until they are 800 grams (1.7 lbs.), and females will breed in the wild at weights as low as 800 grams, though 1200 grams or more is most common--in captivity, breeders generally wait until they are no less than 1500 g (3.3 lbs.). Parental care of the eggs ends once they hatch, and the female leaves the offspring to fend for themselves.

Captivity

These snakes are bred in captivity and are popular as pets, because of their small size (compared to other pythons) and their docile temperament.[11] Juveniles tend to be more aggressive at first, but typically calm down as they get used to human contact. Wild-caught specimens have greater difficulty adapting to a captive environment, which can result in refusal to feed, and they generally carry internal or external parasites which must be eliminated by administering anti-parasitic drugs. Specimens have survived for over 40 years in captivity, with the oldest recorded ball python being more than 48 years old.[12] [5] In captivity, most adult Python regius should be kept in a minimum of a 40 US gallons (150 L) long glass tank, as these pythons are ground dwellers and are highly secretive and largely sedentary. Some large females may require cages up to the 50 US gallons (190 L) long tank. Also, at least two hiding places should be provided at different ends of the tank, one should have a thermostat-controlled heating pad under it to allow the animal to regulate its temperature. Be aware that most snakes are escape artists, therefore the tank should have a locking lid. Juveniles in particular may be stressed by overly large cages that do not have sufficient small hiding spaces. For this reason, baby ball pythons do well in a 10 US gallons (38 L) or 15 US gallons (57 L) cage at first. Controlled temperatures of 80 °F (27 °C) with a 90 °F (32 °C) basking area on one end of the cage are necessary for proper health. Humidity should be maintained at 60% to 80% with dry substrate.

Albino Ball Python
Out of stock


Python regius is a nonvenomous python species found in Africa. This is the smallest of the African pythons and is popular in the pet trade. No subspecies are currently recognized. They are also known as royal pythons or ball pythons. The name ball python refers to the animal's tendency to curl into a ball when stressed or frightened. The name royal python (from the Latin "regius") is based in part on the story that Cleopatra supposedly wore the snake around her wrist.

Description

Adults generally do not grow to more than 90–120 cm (3.0–3.9 ft) in length, although some specimens have reached 152 cm and even 182 cm (5–6 feet), but this is very rare.[5] Females tend to be slightly bigger than males maturing at an average of 4-4.5 feet. Males usually average around 3-3.5 feet.The build is stocky while the head is relatively small. The scales are smooth[5] and both sexes have anal spurs on either side of the vent. Although males tend to have larger spurs, this is not definitive, and sex is best determined via manual eversion of the male hemipenes or inserting a probe into the cloaca to find the inverted hemipenes (if male). When probing to determine sex, males typically measure eight to ten subcaudal scales, and females typically measure two to four subcaudal scales.

The color pattern is typically black or dark brown with light brown or gold sides and dorsal blotches. The belly is a white or cream that may include scattered black markings.[5] However, those in the pet industries have, through selective breeding, developed many morphs (genetic mutations) with altered colors and patterns.

Geographic range

Found in Africa from Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, Niger and Nigeria through Cameroon, Chad and the Central African Republic to Sudan and Uganda. No type locality was given in the original description.

Habitat

Prefers grasslands, savannas and sparsely wooded areas.

Behavior

This terrestrial species is known for its defense strategy that involves coiling into a tight ball when threatened, with its head and neck tucked away in the middle. In this state, it can literally be rolled around. Favored retreats include mammal burrows and other underground hiding places where they also aestivate. In captivity they are considered good pets, for their relatively small size and placid nature make them easy to handle. Captive bred adults rarely bite.

Feeding

In the wild, the diet consists mostly of small mammals, such as African soft-furred rats, shrews and striped mice. Younger individuals have also been known to feed on birds. Pythons that are imported from the wild tend to be picky eaters and may not respond to food as well as captive-bred pythons, which usually do well on domestic rats and mice, either live, pre-killed, or frozen-thawed.[5] The size of the prey item given to a python should be equivalent to or slightly larger than the width of the largest part of their body. This python is known for being a picky eater and may not eat for months, particularly during the winter breeding season. While this is not odd, care should be taken to watch that the snake does not experience significant weight loss. Parasites can also cause the snake to not eat. Other causes of not eating are stress caused by overhandling, or too hot or cold temperatures and not enough areas to hide in the vivarium.

Reproduction


Oviparous, with anywhere from 3-11 rather large, leathery eggs being laid (4-6 being most common).[5] These are incubated by the female under the ground and hatch after 55 to 60 days. Sexual maturity is reached at 11–18 months for males, 20–36 months for females. Age is only one factor in determining sexual maturity and ability to breed – weight is the second factor. Males will breed at 600 grams or more, but in captivity are often not bred until they are 800 grams (1.7 lbs.), and females will breed in the wild at weights as low as 800 grams, though 1200 grams or more is most common--in captivity, breeders generally wait until they are no less than 1500 g (3.3 lbs.). Parental care of the eggs ends once they hatch, and the female leaves the offspring to fend for themselves.

Captivity


These snakes are bred in captivity and are popular as pets, because of their small size (compared to other pythons) and their docile temperament.[11] Juveniles tend to be more aggressive at first, but typically calm down as they get used to human contact. Wild-caught specimens have greater difficulty adapting to a captive environment, which can result in refusal to feed, and they generally carry internal or external parasites which must be eliminated by administering anti-parasitic drugs. Specimens have survived for over 40 years in captivity, with the oldest recorded ball python being more than 48 years old.[12] [5] In captivity, most adult Python regius should be kept in a minimum of a 40 US gallons (150 L) long glass tank, as these pythons are ground dwellers and are highly secretive and largely sedentary. Some large females may require cages up to the 50 US gallons (190 L) long tank. Also, at least two hiding places should be provided at different ends of the tank, one should have a thermostat-controlled heating pad under it to allow the animal to regulate its temperature. Be aware that most snakes are escape artists, therefore the tank should have a locking lid. Juveniles in particular may be stressed by overly large cages that do not have sufficient small hiding spaces. For this reason, baby ball pythons do well in a 10 US gallons (38 L) or 15 US gallons (57 L) cage at first. Controlled temperatures of 80 °F (27 °C) with a 90 °F (32 °C) basking area on one end of the cage are necessary for proper health. Humidity should be maintained at 60% to 80% with dry substrate.

Baby Corn Snakes
Out of stock

Housing
Most adult Corn Snakes will live comfortably in a 20-gallon tank provided that you let them out for exercise. Bigger is always better in this case though and a 30-gallon or larger would be very nice. The tank must have a locking screen top. This is very important. Most pet stores sell clips that lock the top down securely. Buying 4 clips will ensure that you won't be doing any "snake hunting" around the house. People will tell you to just stack books on top, but beware, snakes are escape artists that can wriggle through a very small hole. Enough said.


Snake Home Interiors


Some good substrates for the bottom of the tank are newspaper, pine bark chips (from a pet store, no pesticides), or aspen bedding. Newspaper is probably the best substrate available. It is clean and cheap. When it gets soiled just crumple it up and throw it away. Although seemingly perfect in every way, unfortunately newsprint is not very eye appealing. This is where pine bark chips come in. If properly obtained (through a reputable pet store) they are relatively clean. The soiled pieces can be scooped out as they appear and the whole tank can be emptied on a regular basis and disinfected. Aspen bedding is my personal favorite. The manufacturers claim the pieces are small enough so that if ingestion occurs no harm will come to the animal. In fact, I have seen all my snakes ingest the Aspen at one time or another. I have used it successfully for several years now.
Pine shavings, corncob, and sand are no good because they can easily become ingested and lead to impaction. Dirt from outside is not suitable because it has bacteria and could have parasites in it. (Dirt can be used in emergency situations, although I can't imagine what that could be. Just put the dirt in a pan and bake it at 300 degrees for about 15 minutes. Let it cool first before putting it into the cage, obviously.)
Your Corn Snake needs a hide box in which to feel secure. I have used many different objects for this purpose. Half a log, a small cardboard box with a hole cut in the side, various fake logs from the pet store, and even a heavy plastic cup if there's nothing else around. The shelter should be slightly larger than the animal so it can touch all the sides and feel cozy. Whatever you choose it should be easily cleaned or disposed of (in the case of the box) when soiled.
A Corn Snake of all snakes definitely needs a climbing branch. (If the branch comes from outside you may either bake it in the oven like the dirt, see above, or you may pour boiling water over the branch outside. Baking is more thorough.) The best way to secure the branch is to extend it from the bottom of one corner diagonally to the opposite corner near the top. (By the way, be careful when opening the top that your snake is not perched on top between the cage and the screen. You don't want to squish anyone!) Aside from the branch other decorations can be used like plastic trees and such. Just make sure they are easy to clean.



Water!


Your Corn Snake is going to need a water dish filled with clean water at all times. It should be big enough for him to get his whole body into. Yes, they like to "take a bath" once in a while. Many times when your snake is going to shed he will take a dip in his water dish to help the skin come off. Unfortunately most snakes also like to relieve themselves while in water also. This is just a fact of life and you must be prepared to change the water frequently. Actually it makes cage cleanup very easy when they go in the water. I've had some snakes that go every time in their water and I've had others who never go near the water except to drink. Go figure.


Heating


All snakes are Poikilothermic (cold-blooded). This means that they cannot regulate their body temperature like we can. Without proper heating their tank can get too cold and they can die. If their tank gets too hot they can die from overheating, as they have no way to lower their body temperature. Corn Snakes are from North America so obviously they come across cold temperatures. Out in the wild they hibernate. If you don't keep a constant temperature year-round in your Corn Snake's cage he too will go into hibernation.
If you want to cool your snakes down for breeding you need to let them get all the food out of their systems first. Don't feed them for a couple of weeks prior to cooling and make sure that they defecate also. This is so the food doesn't just rot in their stomach. Obviously you do not want to feed them while they are cooled down. If on an off chance they took the food they wouldn't be able to digest it without proper heat. Personally I recommend keeping your Corn Snake at an even temperature year round. 75 degrees is a nice average temperature that they seem to be happy at.
One of the best types of heat that I have used for Corn Snakes is the undertank pad from Repti-therm or heat tape manufactured just for the herpetological community. The Repti-therms have always worked well for me but I've heard on a few occasions that they have gotten hot enough to crack the bottom of the tank. Obviously this is not good. If you choose the Repti-therms please check them out from time to time to see that they are not getting too hot. Basically, if you cannot hold your hand on the heater it is too hot. For safety I usually put newspaper down under the bark chips or aspen bedding. This dissipates the heat so as not to burn your snake. Many times snakes aren't bright enough to realize they are getting burnt and will stay on the hot area until much damage has occurred.
The heat tapes as far as I know don't get as hot as the Repti-therms. You can buy the heat tape in strips that are 3" or 11" wide and as long as you want. This is ideal when more than one tank is going to be heated. In any case your snake needs a temperature variant. Place the heating pad at one end of the tank not in the center. This allows the snake to sit on the heat, near the heat, or away from the heat. A good variant for a Corn Snake is from 65-82 degrees (room temp. at one end with the heating pad at the other end). This is a natural variant the snake would find in the wild on a nice July day. 82 degrees in the sun and 65 down in the shade under some leaves. The 3" heat tape can be use similarly by letting it run along the backside under the tank. (11" tape would be too wide for a 20-gallon tank.)

Feeding


Your Corn Snake will eat approximately one mouse per week depending on the size of the snake and the size of the feeder mouse. As a rule don't feed rodents that are more than 1 1/2 times the width of your snake's head. While it is possible for your snake to eat bigger mice than that it is also possible for him to choke on it. Better safe than sorry.
Now for the live versus dead debate: I am wholeheartedly for feeding dead food to snakes and lizards. Corn Snakes in general adapt well to eating pre-killed rodents. The reasons for feeding pre-killed are simple. Live mice and rats can and will bite your snake. If your snake is not hungry for whatever reason an unattended mouse can do major damage to the captive snake. Constrictor snakes, of which your Corn Snake is one, don't really have much in the way of defense. In the wild if threatened chances are they will flee. There is nowhere to flee to in your snake's tank. Another reason not to feed live is to alleviate unnecessary suffering in the food animal. Usually feeder rodents are killed with a swift blow to the head that results in instant death. I feel that this is far more humane than letting the snake slowly suffocate the animal. Dead animals are also easier to coat with vitamins and calcium. In the event of any reptile illness it is also much easier to stick medication in the dead animal's mouth than into a live one's.
The animals that I have are all eating pre-killed frozen rodents. There are quite a few places to get frozen feeder rodents. They are shipped overnight express with dry ice. If you order in bulk (50 or more) the extra cost of overnight shipping divided over the number of rodents is insignificant when compared to the cost of individuals at a pet store that you have to kill yourself. With any luck there is a herp show near you at some point in the year at which you should be able to purchase frozen feeder mice in quantity. When you buy at the shows large mice are about $.50 each as compared to at leat $2.00 each for a live mouse at the pet store. You do the math!

Handling


Baby Corn Snakes tame down VERY quickly. All it takes is some daily handling for about a week and they become very "friendly". An adult that hasn't been handled much will tame down also although maybe not so fast. Babies may nip at you at first but that should end quickly. It doesn't hurt much anyway.
When picking up a Corn Snake you want to be gentle but firm. A small snake or a baby can be picked up with one hand. A larger one needs to be supported with both hands. Don't just pick up an adult by either end while letting the other end dangle. If the snake feels unsupported it might thrash around and injure itself.
Let a baby Corn Snake slither through your fingers, back and forth between your hands. Just keep letting him crawl around. He may be fast at first but once he figures out that you don't want to hurt him or eat him he will calm down. Corn Snakes don't calm down as much as the Pythons or Boas. It is just their nature to be more active. Don't expect to be able to walk around the house with your adult Corn Snake wrapped around your neck. It is more likely that he will be crawling all over the place and attempting to wrap around anything you walk near.
Never walk around in public with your snake wrapped around your neck or wrapped around anything else for that matter. The snake probably doesn't enjoy it all that much. There are also a lot of people that are already afraid of them and don't need to be surprised by one roaming the streets. Snake-a-phobes already think we are crazy to keep these great creatures. We don't need to dangle them in their faces.

Conclusion


With the proper care as outlined above your Corn Snake should live a long, happy life with you. They are clean, quiet, hypoallergenic, beautiful creatures are easy to take care of and don't care if you go off on vacation for the weekend or several weeks!

Red-eyed tree frogs
Out of stock


As their name states, have red eyes with vertically narrowed noses, a vibrant green body with yellow and blue striped sides, and orange toes. There is a great deal of regional variation in flank and thigh coloration . Although it has been suggested that A. callidryas' bright colors function as aposematic or sexual signals, neither of these hypotheses have been confirmed . Males range from 2 (5.08 centimetres) to 2½ inches (6.35 centimetres), while female range from 2½ (6.35 centimetres) to 3 inches (7.62 centimetres) on average. Young frogs are typically brown in color and turn greener as they mature, although adult frogs can change their color slightly depending on mood and environment. Red-eyed tree frogs have soft, fragile skin on their stomach, and the skin on their back is thicker and rougher.

The red-eyed tree frog has three eyelids and sticky pads on its toes. Phyllomedusid tree frogs are arboreal animals, meaning they spend a majority of their life in trees, which also makes them great jumpers.

Red-eyed tree frogs are not poisonous and rely on camouflage to protect themselves. During the day, they remain motionless, cover their blue sides with their back legs, tuck their bright feet under their stomach, and shut their red eyes. Thus, they appear almost completely green, and well hidden among the foliage.

Diet

Red-eyed tree frogs are carnivorous and eat crickets, moths, flies, and other insects, and have been known to eat other small frogs. For froglets, fruit flies and pinhead crickets are the meals of choice

Pac-Man (Albino)
Out of stock


Ceratophrys is a genus of frogs in the family Leptodactylidae, subfamily Ceratophryinae. They are also known as South American horned frogs as well as Pacman frogs due to their characteristically large mouth and abdomen, thus resembling the video game character Pac-Man.


Care in captivity

In captivity, these frogs can live in a 10 gallon aquarium for their entire lives. They thrive best with shallow water, loose substrate (like coconut husk fiber), and hiding places. They will commonly cover themselves with substrate or just sit contentedly in the water. These frogs should be misted daily to ensure proper humidity. Temperatures should be maintained between 75° and 80° Fahrenheit (24° to 27° Celsius) during the day, dropping a few degrees at night. They can be fed crickets, earthworms, silkworms, phoenix worms, butterworms, and occasionally guppies, mice, and waxworms. Mealworms and superworms should not be fed to them, due to their hard chitinous shell

Lifespan

The average lifespan of a Ceratophrys frog in the wild varies between 1 and 4 years, though in captivity and as pets, depending on diet, they may live 6 to 10 years and even longer.

Diet

They are voracious eaters, often eating insects, small mammals (such as mice), fish, other frogs, and small reptiles. A fully grown female Argentine Horned Frog (females are generally larger than males) can easily eat a grown rat.

These frogs are also known to be cannibalistic [2], and have been known to eat their mates, even if they are larger than they are. It is advisable to isolate multiple frogs.

Although these frogs can swallow animals almost half their size, they sometimes attempt to eat things larger than they are. A row of sharp bony projections in their upper jaw makes it nearly impossible for them to release prey after taking it in their mouth, in some cases leading to death by choking.

Green tree frog
Out of stock


The green tree frog is native to the south-eastern parts of the United States. They are commonly seen in Florida, South Carolina, Arkansas, and southern Georgia in the local shrubbery of the neighborhoods. They can be heard calling at night in the spring and early summer along side lagoons and ponds. They are a simple yet attractive frog that can make an interesting and neat but easy to care for pet. In this document I will go over the care and maintenance of this frog and hopefully clear up any questions anyone may have if you already own one.

Setup
Since your frog is native to a semi-tropical climate it will obviously need a semi-tropical setup. You will want to start with the enclosure itself. Glass aquariums work the best not only because they are easy to clean but they make for good visibility inside. You will want to use nothing less than a 10 gallon. Since this is a tree frog, an enclosure that is taller than it is longer would work the best. A screen top is also required for security reasons and good ventilation.

As for the substrate, I use Astroturf which can be easily purchased at your local hardware store or even a pet store. You can also use the reptile carpeting. I feel these substrates work the best because there is no risk of a frog ingesting anything while feeding.

As for cage furniture, you can use driftwood, cork bark, sticks and branches (warning: anything you collect from the outside must first be soaked in a mild bleach and water solution overnight, then soaked in water for another night and allowed to thoroughly air dry to kill any bacteria or bugs that may harm your frogs. Be sure the items are not releasing any fumes when they are placed into the enclosure).

You will also need some kind of foliage. You can use fake or live plants, but unless you are setting up a very large and elaborate setup, fake are the best as live plants are hard to keep alive indoors, unless you are planning on using air plants. Those work well, but make sure you don't let them dry out (avoid keeping these plants under or over heat sources).

You will want to place the sticks and any wood pieces on diagonals from corner to corner and on slant from high to low. You will also have to supply your frogs with de-chlorinated water for soaking and defecation. This water must be changed every day or when dirtied to prevent bacterial infections!! The best container for this is a shallow bowl with about 1 to 2 inches of water. You can use anything that is heavy enough the frogs can't knock over, although a store bought water bowl specially made for terrariums will look the best and add a realistic flair to your enclosure.

Lighting
Since these frogs are nocturnal you do not need any special incandescent or fluorescent lighting.

Heating
For heat you can use under tank heaters situated under one end of the enclosure (not in the middle). NOTE: Do not use these heaters (undertank) with wood enclosures!! You may want to put a rock over the area that is being heated to absorb heat. My frogs constantly use this method to obtain heat. Another heating method is to use a nocturnal heat lamp (no larger than 15 watts) situated over a high point in the enclosure. (Make sure there is a screen cover between the lamp and the frogs!!) My frogs also seem to enjoy this method.

Care
Your frogs are insectivores and will take small insects that they can easily fit in their mouths. I find crickets to be the best because they are readily available and are easy to breed on your own. Whatever the food, make sure the insects have a day in their own enclosure to get some food. T-Rex sells a cricket food for gut-loading that I use and find to be very inexpensive and good. The food contains extra calcium so the frogs will benefit from the nutrient rich gut of the insects. You will also want to coat the food with calcium and multi-vitamin supplements about 3 times a week. The frogs also need to be misted once a day with de-chlorinated water. Do all spraying in the morning to prevent any bacterial buildup.

Cleaning
You should thoroughly clean the enclosure once a week. This involves taking every thing out and rinsing and scrubbing it under hot water(no soap). You may want to place the frogs in a small container at this time. The tank itself will need to be cleaned too (hot water, no soap). As for the carpeting, this you can wash with laundry detergent but it must be rinsed well with cold clean water. You may find it useful to have two pieces of carpet so when one is dirty you will always have a clean one ready to go in.

Red Foot Tortoise
Babies and adults in stock
Yellow foot adult also available


HOUSING RED-FOOTS INDOORS - The most common form of indoor accommodation for small or medium sized red-foot Tortoises consists of a “turtle table’  To all appearances this looks like a bookshelf unit flipped onto its back. A reasonable size for a hatchling is 2 feet by 3 feet as the animal grows the size of this habitat should be increased.   For an adult red-foot tortoise the indoor accommodation should be at least 6 feet by 4 feet Into the bottom of this “turtle table” holes can be cut to allow for the sinking of food , water and eventually nesting containers flush with the surface for easier animal access.

The water area of the habitat should be large enough to allow the tortoise to soak in it if it wishes - it must also be shallow enough to protect from drowning. Cypress mulch is the indoor  substrate of choice for this species due to it's humidity retention characteristics which in turn leads to good scute and skin health.

In one corner of the environment a  100W spot lamp should be positioned to provide artificial basking facilities. This should be positioned to provide a basking spot of 90 degrees F (32 degrees C) or so in that section of the habitat.  The habitat should also be equipped with a full spectrum fluorescent light to provide for UVB. A UVB source is necessary for Vitamin D3 syntheses (needed in calcium metabolism)  If preferred to this lighting arrangement a Mercury vapor bulb may be used that fulfills all requirements. There should be a hide box located in the corner away from the basking spot to allow the animal a cool dim retreat.


OUTDOOR HOUSING - Predator proof outdoor habitats offer many advantages over indoor accommodations and should seriously be considered as an option during warm weather.   Overall, this species does best in naturally humid climates outdoors.   If your area is not naturally humid, water timers and a misting/sprinkler system can be utilized to artificially create one.  Some areas of the habitat should be heavily planted to allow the Red-foot a cool dim retreat.  Provision of a wet muddy area for wallowing will also be appreciated by your tortoise. Redfoots take readily to using a hutch or doghouse-like artificial retreat.  In areas with cool nights a thermostatically controlled ceramic heater in such a retreat will provide the tortoise with an area that remains above 60 degrees F (16 C)     

DIET - Red-foots are omnivorous, consuming both animal and plant material in the wild.  In captivity this may be duplicated by feeding a minimal amount of low fat dog food or whole meat product once every couple weeks or so.  Meat should not be fed as a part of the daily diet.  Occasional earthworms may be fed as well.  We have found that red-foots thrive on a diet supplemented with Mazuri Tortoise Diet which was initially formulated for the closely related Galapagos Tortoises.

The diet offered should consist of:  

   Leafy greens  (dandelions, clover, endive etc.)  

   Fruits

   OCCASIONAL meat based protein.

Diets rich in meats are invariably high in phosphates and low in calcium. This can cause serious problems for tortoises who need high levels of calcium for healthy bone and carapace development. Additional calcium supplementation is therefore absolutely essential. For proper growth as well as egg production, powdered calcium can be sprinkled on all foods once a week to help meet these requirements.  It is suggested that one use calcium supplemented with vitamin D3 if the animal is being maintained indoors and calcium without D3 if it is outdoors. Provision of a cuttlefish bone, which can be gnawed if required, is also recommended. The substrate of choice is cypress mulch or something possessing the same humidity holding properties in order to keep their shells/skin from drying out in captive conditions. In outdoor pens in areas of high sand content,  food  should not be placed directly on sandy soil. Sand can build up in the tortoises GI tract leading to possible impaction and even death.  A completely separate sand-free area in the habitat should be utilized to feed.

This species does not hibernate in nature.  Facilities must be provided for the continued health and well being of the tortoise indoors in cooler (non tropical) climates.  

It should be noted that turtle and tortoise care research is ongoing. As new information becomes available we share this on the World Chelonian Trust web site at www.chelonia.org. Serious keepers find it to be a benefit to have the support of others who keep these species. Care is discussed in our free online email community, which may be joined from the web address above. Please contact us about the many benefits of becoming a member of the World Chelonian Trust.

Yellow-bellied slider
More coming soon


(Trachemys scripta scripta) is a land and water turtle belonging to the family Emydidae. This subspecies of pond slider is native to the southeastern United States, specifically from Florida to southeastern Virginia,[1] and is the most common turtle species in its range.[2] It is found in a wide variety of habitats, including slow-moving rivers, floodplain swamps, marshes, seasonal wetlands, and permanent ponds.[3] Yellow-bellied sliders are popular as pets.

Description

Adult male yellow-bellied sliders typically reach 5–8 inches (13–20 cm) in length; females are anywhere from 8–13 inches (20–33 cm).[4] The carapace (upper shell) is typically brown and black, often with yellow stripes. The skin is olive green with prominent patches of yellow down the neck and legs. As the name implies, the plastron (bottom shell) is mostly yellow with green spots along the edges. Adult males tend to grow darker as they age.[5][6] Yellow-bellied sliders are often confused with Eastern River Cooters, who also have yellow stripes on the neck and yellow undersides, but the latter lack the green spots characteristic to T. scripta scripta and the yellow belly often has a "s" like yellow stripe on its face.

Mating can occur in spring, summer, and autumn. Yellow-bellied sliders are capable of interbreeding with other T. scripta subspecies, such as red-eared sliders, which are also commonly sold as pets. The release of non-native red-eared sliders into local environments caused the state of Florida to ban the sale of red-eared sliders so as to protect the native population of yellow-bellied sliders.[7]

Mating takes place in the water, but some suitable terrestrial area is required for egg-laying by nesting females, who will normally lay 6–10 eggs at a time, with larger females capable of bearing more. The eggs incubate for 2–3 months and the hatchlings will usually stay with the nest through winter. Hatchlings are almost entirely carnivorous, feeding on insects, spiders, crustaceans, tadpoles, fish, and carrion. As they age, adults eat less and less meat such that up to 95% of their nutritional intake comes from plants.[6]

The slider is considered a diurnal turtle; it feeds mainly in the morning and frequently basks on shore, on logs, or while floating, during the rest of the day. At night, it sleeps lying on the bottom or resting on the surface near brush piles, but in all cases it prefers to stay in the water. Highest densities of sliders occur where algae blooms and aquatic macrophytes are abundant and are of the type that form dense mats at the surface, such as Myriophyllum spicatum and lily pads (Nymphaeaceae). Dense surface vegetation provides cover from predators and supports high densities of aquatic invertebrates and small vertebrates, which offers better foraging than open water.[8]

The lifespan of yellow-bellied sliders is over 30 years in the wild,[9] and over 40 years in captivity.

As pets
Housing


Baby yellow-bellied sliders may be kept in a 10-US-gallon (38 l) aquarium, but as they age, they will require much more space. One or two adults may be housed in a 75 US gal (284 l) (or larger) aquarium. The turtles require enough water to turn around should they fall on their backs, with a depth of 16–18 in (41–46 cm) recommended. Water temperature should be kept between 72–80°F (22–27°C) and properly filtered.[6] Fish may not be kept together with the turtles. Sliders need a basking area that is kept warm during the day and that will allow the turtle to move around, balance, and dry off completely. This area should average 89–95°F (32–35°C) and can be heated with a UV-B heat lamp, although direct sunlight is always preferable. The lamp should be switched on during daylight hours.[6] Turtle banks can be purchased at many pet goods retailers.
[edit] Diet

Pond plants such as elodea and cabomba can be left in the water, while human-consumed vegetables such as romaine lettuce, escarole and collard greens must be changed daily. As sliders are omnivores, insects and freshly killed fish may also be provided for protein. Commercially processed animal-based reptile food may be given too, but any leftovers should be immediately removed to prevent fouling the water.
[edit] See also

COBALT BLUE TARANTULA
Out of stock


A native of the both Burma and Thailand, this spider was first described by Smith.

It lives in a labyrinth of extensive burrows in the tropical forests of those countries.

This species is most notable for its beautiful iridescent (electric) blue color of the legs. The carapace is usually a light brown with the abdomen a dark grey/brown, often with chevron-like stripes.

One keeper described this spider thus:

"One of the most aggressive, most beautiful, and high strung tarantula in the spider world. Females are a blue color and males are brown. Only recommended for advanced keepers".

This spider is usually described as "one of the most bad-tempered/aggressive spiders in the hobby, it is well known for its lightning speed."

My own specimen of this tarantula (Lightning) was very fast, not exactly aggressive, but I have more that a little respect for her. Not for the faint hearted as it can be a bit of an escapologist.

PLEASE NOTE: This spider should never be handled and certainly is not recommended for a newcomer to tarantulas. This one is for the experienced keeper only.

The requirements in captivity are:

As for keeping them as pets, many people keep these in large 12x12x12 (inches) tanks.

Like the other tropical species they require high humidity levels (above 80%).

As these spiders are keen burrowers, you must make sure a suitable material is used for the substrate. Substrate for the cage should be of peat/vermiculite mix, should be at least 3 inches deep.

An open water dish is a must, as is regular spraying of the tank with a plant mister. On no account should the humidity level fall below 70 percent!

Food: All standard invertebrates

Type: Terrestrial (Tropical)

Aggressiveness: Considered very bad tempered.

Venom Effect: Not yet known.

Geographic Range: Burma, Thailand

Humidity: 85%

Substrate: 3 inches (at least).

Shelter: Burrower, so makes it's own home!

Water: Open water dish.

Longevity: Unknown.

   PINKTOE TARANTULA
In stock


This species of pinktoe tarantula, known simply as the Pinktoe Tarantula, is common, docile, beautiful, and can be speedy. Although generally easy to rear, they can become more of a challenge if more than one are kept together in a terrarium. Unlike other tarantulas, the Pinktoe Tarantula may be kept socially, if provided with certain conditions detailed under "Housing" below. Ventilation is very important with this species, and many people have lost tarantulas due to the poor ventilation. These tarantulas need higher humidity than most other species as well, making ventilation even more important! If the air in the tank is damp and stale, molds can grow, making it a dangerous environment for the tarantula. Death can occur from molds growing in the spiders' lungs. Overall, the Pinktoe Tarantula can be an inexpensive and rewarding tarantula species to keep in captivity.
Range  Tropical areas of Brazil, Trinidad, Guyana, French Guyana, Surinam, Venezuela, and throughout the Amazon Basin.
Type  Arboreal.
Diet  Spiderlings eat flightless fruit flies, pinhead crickets, and other small insects. Adults eat crickets, moths, flies, other large insects, and an occasional small lizard or pinkie mouse.
Full Grown Size  4.5 to 5 inches.
Growth  Medium speed.
Temperature  75 to 85° F.
Humidity  78 to 82%. All tarantulas that have at least a 3" legspan may drink from a shallow, wide water dish.
Temperament  Docile and active.
Housing  Spiderlings can live in a tall clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 10 to 40-gallon tank, depending on the number of tarantulas. This Avicularia species can be kept communally in a large, well-planted terrarium with many hiding spots and broad-leaved plants. There should be little or no cannibalism, especially if the tarantulas are about the same size. Height is more important than floor space.
Substrate  2 to 3 inches of peat moss, potting soil, or wood chips.
Decor  Branches, live plants, vines, etc. make good hiding places and provide a base for the web. Moss can be added for floor cover.
Other Names  Guyana Pinktoe Tarantula, Common Pinktoe Tarantula, and South American Pinktoe Tarantula.

*Please note that ALL tarantulas have a certain amount of venom. Although most people are not affected by this species, some people may be allergic to the venom, or just more sensitive, making it a dangerous situation. This is one of the reasons that people should not handle this tarantula. Also, New World species of tarantulas like this one can rub urticating hairs off of their abdomens, which can also cause a reaction, depending on the person. Affects of this tarantulas' natural defenses may vary between people. All tarantulas should be considered dangerous, so be careful, because you don't want to find out if you are allergic or more sensitive the HARD WAY!

MEXICAN FIRELEG TARANTULA
Out of stock


Common Name(s): Mexican Fireleg

Experience Level: Beginner

Range: Pacific coast of southern Mexico (southeastern Michoacan to northwestern Guerrero)

Habitat: dry thorn forest

Habits: fossorial species that lives in burrows in thorny brush thickets and under large rocks

Behavior: fairly docile species that like all Brachypelma will readily flick urticating hairs when disturbed

Temperature & Humidity: warm [70-78°F] & moderately dry [50-60% RH]

Housing: simple terrestrial cage with plenty of ventilation (a plastic critter keeper style terrarium is excellent), dry substrate (commercial organic cactus soil mixes are excellent but dry coconut coir or 50/50 sphagnum peat moss/vermiculite mix are just as good), hiding place and very small water dish — extra care should be used when raising spiderlings as small containers typically used, such as vials or small jars with lids with small air holes, are too poorly ventilated (we use 16 oz. deli cups with insect cup style lids to raise young tarantulas)

Captive Diet: crickets, superworms, grasshoppers, small roaches

Emperor Scorpion
In stock


The emperor scorpion, Pandinus imperator, is a species of scorpion native to Africa. It is one of the largest scorpions in the world and lives for 5–8 years. Its body is black, but glows under ultraviolet light. It is a popular species in the pet trade-

Description


The emperor scorpion (Pandinus imperator) is one of the largest species of scorpion in the world, with adults averaging about 20 centimetres (7.9 in) in length. However, some species of forest scorpions are fairly similar to the emperor scorpion in size, and one scorpion, Heterometrus swammerdami, holds the record for being the world's largest scorpion at 9 inches (23 cm) in length.[2] The life span of the emperor scorpion usually ranges from 5 to 8 years of life when held in captivity.

The emperor scorpion has a dark body which ranges from dark blue-green through brown to black. The large pincers are blackish-red and have a granular texture. The front part of the body, or prosoma, is made up of four sections, each with a pair of legs. Behind the fourth pair of legs are comb-like structures known as pectines, which are longer in males. The tail, known as the metasoma, is long and curves back over the body. It ends in the large receptacle containing the venom glands and is tipped with the sharp, curved stinger. Sensory hairs cover the pincers and tail, enabling the emperor scorpion to detect prey through vibrations in the air and ground.

When gravid (pregnant), the body of a female expands to expose the whitish membranes connecting the segments. The emperor scorpion fluoresces greenish-blue under ultra-violet light.

The emperor scorpion is an African rainforest species.
It is found in a number of African countries, including Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Togo, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

This species inhabits both tropical forest and open savannas. The emperor scorpion burrows beneath the soil and hides beneath rocks and debris,[4] and also often burrows in termite mounds.

Emperor scorpion venom contains a toxin called imperatoxin.

Moon Crab
Out of stock


Origin:
The Moon Crab can be found mostly in Costa Rica.

Size and Longevity:

Moon Crabs can grow anywhere from 2 inches to 2.4 inches long and have a lifespan of 8 to 10 years.

General Description:

The Moon Crab does well in captivity and is tame, but it does require constant attention. Like most reptiles, Moon Crabs are Nocturnal, which means they sleep during the day and come out at night. These reptiles require a lot of heat and moisture and several homes(shells) throughout it's lifespan. Crabs are social creatures by nature and live longer, healthier lives when in the company of crabs of the same species.

Habitat and Cage:

Moon Crabs do not need much space when they are young, but they do enjoy climbing, and as they grow their environment must be able to sustain them. The most common size for an enclosure is a 10 or 15 gallon aquarium with at least two water dishes and some things to hide in. The water dishes should be short and wide to allow access and keep the water from running dry. Water should be changed daily to ensure the water is clean and to prevent bacteria from growing.

A moist substrate needs to be provided to create a good humidity level for your pet and provide them a place to dig. The most commonly used substrate is about 4 to 6 inches of sand and then an additional 3 to 6 inches of moist peat moss. Moon crabs need a large amount of water to survive and a constant humidity level right around 70%. The terrarium should be set up so that the temperature is between 80° and 85°F and should not be allowed to drop below 78°F or be raised above 85°F at any time.

A low wattage lightbulb is the most suitable lighting for Moon Crabs because it helps keep the humidity high while keeping the terrarium darker. Less light will make the crab feel more confortable and safe while still providing enough light to see them and enough heat to create evaporation.

Molting:

Molting is the process of the crab losing a layer of skin and growing a new one. This happens approximately once every 18 months and takes several days to complete. The first signs that a crab is multing is when it turns a very dull color and/or turns white around the eyes. During this time, darkness is encouraged and handling should be limited to little or none. Provide food as normal but keep the lights low or off, and do not try to peak or disturb the crab if it is hiding. After the molting process is complete the crab will eat some or most of it's old skin to gain the calcium and other nutrients in it. This is natural and should be allowed to happen. If the exoskeleton is not completely eaten within two days of molting then it is ok to take it out. For a healthier diet, some people recommend grinding up the remainder of the exoskeleton and adding it to the next meal.

There should be several shells of different sizes in the enclosure for the Moon Crab to be able to rehome itself after molting. Not providing an adequate amount of shells can lead to discomfort which can cause health problems and even death. Most baby Moon crabs need an shell with an opening of about 1/4" wide and adults will need an opening of about 1 1/2" wide. All shells should be cleaned thoroughly with water (no soap) prior to being placed with the Moon Crab.

Feeding:

Moon crabs will eat just about anything, but should not be fed everything. Good food sources include fruits such as what they would find in their natural environment like mangoes, papayas, and coconuts. Vegetables of all kinds also provide proper nutrients. They will also eat meats, but the meat must be cooked thoroughly or your Moon crab may be at risk of health problems. Crabs will not eat when they are not hungry, so over feeding will not be a problem. Place a small amount of food in the feeding dish each day and remove any left-overs from the day before. If there is no left over food then try adding a little more each day until there is at least a little left over (under feeding your pet can be deadly).

Handling a Moon Crab can be confusing and somewhat tricky. Each crab has it's own attitude and behavior, which at times can be very frustrating. Handling your crab daily will help it acclimate to human interaction and may change it's disposition to a more human-friendly one. Some may always want to pinch or stay tucked away and then there are others who are always craving attention and are not shy at all. The best advice is to learn your crab's behaviors and deal with them accordingly.

HERMIT CRABS
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Hermit crabs are decapod crustaceans of the superfamily Paguroidea. Most of the 1100 species possess an asymmetrical abdomen which is concealed in an empty gastropod shell that is carried around by the hermit crab.

Most species have long, spirally curved abdomens, which are soft, unlike the hard, calcified abdomens seen in related crustaceans. The vulnerable abdomen is protected from predators by a salvaged empty seashell carried by the hermit crab, into which its whole body can retract.[3] Most frequently hermit crabs use the shells of sea snails (although the shells of bivalves and scaphopods and even hollow pieces of wood and stone are used by some species).[4] The tip of the hermit crab's abdomen is adapted to clasp strongly onto the columella of the snail shell.[5]

As the hermit crab grows in size, it has to find a larger shell and abandon the previous one. This habit of living in a second hand shell gives rise to the popular name "hermit crab", by analogy to a hermit who lives alone.[6] Several hermit crab species, both terrestrial and marine, use "vacancy chains" to find new shells: when a new, bigger shell becomes available, hermit crabs gather around it and form a kind of queue from largest to smallest. When the largest crab moves into the new shell, the second biggest crab moves into the newly vacated shell, thereby making its previous shell available to the third crab, and so on.

Most species are aquatic and live in varying depths of saltwater, from shallow reefs and shorelines to deep sea bottoms. Tropical areas host some terrestrial species, though even those have aquatic larvae and therefore need access to water for reproduction.

A few species do not use a "mobile home" and inhabit immobile structures left by polychaete worms, vermetid gastropods, corals and sponges.[4]
Biology

As hermit crabs grow they require larger shells. Since suitable intact gastropod shells are sometimes a limited resource, there is often vigorous competition among hermit crabs for shells. The availability of empty shells at any given place depends on the relative abundance of gastropods and hermit crabs, matched for size. An equally important issue is the population of organisms that prey upon gastropods and leave the shells intact.[9] Hermit crabs that are kept together may fight or kill a competitor to gain access to the shell they favour. However, if the crabs vary significantly in size, the occurrence of fights over empty shells will decrease or remain non-existent.[8]

A hermit crab with a shell that is too small cannot grow as fast as those with well-fitting shells, and is more likely to be eaten if it cannot retract completely into the shell.

For some larger marine species, supporting one or more sea anemones on the shell can scare away predators. The sea anemone benefits, because it is in position to consume fragments of the hermit crab's meals.
Development and reproduction

Hermit crab species range in size and shape, from species with a carapace only a few millimetres long to Coenobita brevimanus, which can live 30–70 years and can approach the size of a coconut. The shell-less hermit crab Birgus latro (coconut crab) is the world's largest terrestrial invertebrate.

The young develop in stages, with the first two (the nauplius and protozoea) occurring inside the egg. Most hermit crab larvae hatch at the third stage, the zoea. This is a larval stage wherein the crab has several long spines, a long narrow abdomen, and large fringed antennae. After several zoeal moults, this is followed by the final larval stage, the megalopa stage.

Classification

It is firmly established that hermit crabs are more closely related to squat lobsters and porcelain crabs than they are to true crabs (Brachyura). However, the relationship of king crabs to the rest of Paguroidea is a highly contentious topic. Many studies based on physical characteristics, genetic information and combined data support the longstanding hypothesis that the king crabs in the family Lithodidae are derived hermit crabs and should be classified as a family within Paguroidea. Other researchers have challenged this, asserting that Lithodidae (king crabs) should be placed with Hapalogastridae in a separate superfamily Lithodoidea.Six families are formally recognized in the superfamily Paguroidea,[1] containing around 1100 species in total in 120 genera.[2]

FIRE-BELLIED TOADS
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The Fire-bellied Toads is a group comprising eight species of small toads (typically no longer than 1.6 inches) belonging to the genus Bombina. Common variants of the name 'Fire-bellied toad' include 'firebelly toad' and 'firebellied toad'.

"Fire-bellied" is derived from the brightly coloured red- or yellow-and-black patterns on the toads' ventral regions, which act as aposematic coloration, a warning to predators of the toads' reputedly foul taste. The other parts of the toads' skins are green or dark brown. When confronted with a potential predator, these toads commonly engage in an Unkenreflex, "Unken" being the plural form of "Unke", German for firebellied toad. In the Unkenreflex, the toad arches its back, raising its front and back legs to display the aposematic coloration of its ventral side.

Species


The female of the species typically lays 80–300 eggs that can be found hanging off plant stems. The offspring develop in pools or puddles. Their metamorphosis is complete within a few weeks, peaking in July–August. The toadlets attain a length of 12–15 mm. The eggs, laid in August, metamorphose only after the winter, with the toadlets attaining a length of 3–5 cm. These toadlets still have a white belly.

Tadpoles eat mainly algae and higher plants. The toadlets and the toads consume insects, such as flies and beetles, but also invertebrates such as annelid worms, and terrestrial arthropods.

Fire-bellied toads are active both day and night.

The mating call of the male sounds like a dog's bark and will be very light to hear.
Fire Bellied Toads in Captivity

Several species in the genus Bombina, particularly B. orientalis, B bombina, and B. variegata, are commonly kept as exotic pets and are readily available in many pet stores. In captivity, they are easily maintained in vivariums and when provided with proper food and environmental conditions, often prove robust, flamboyant and long lived amphibians. Captive fire-bellied toads usually live to be around 12 years old, and there are several cases reported by owners of fire-bellied toads attaining ages up to 30 years.

It is risky to house any type of these toads with other species, as they secrete toxins from glands behind the head. In some individuals there is a spot of color, such as green or brown, where these glands are located. For this reason, it is extremely important that any water in the habitat is changed every few days or is filtered as the toxin will build up in the water and can harm the toads. Many species do not seem to be bothered by the toxins if the primary water source is filtered properly.

In captivity they will eat a wide variety of food, including crickets, moths, minnows, blood worms and pinkie mice, although some frogs cannot handle certain foods, due to their size. Smaller frogs like smaller food, and the same goes for bigger frogs.

In vivariums (Habitations with both terra and water) each toad usually requires at least 3 gallons, however 3 toads can fit into an 8 gallon vivarium with proper treatment.

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